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The image shown is a lenticular cloud, a type of cloud often observed around significant topographical features such as the mountain peaks shown in the photo. Depending on the local atmospheric moisture, they can occur on their own (as in this case), apart from other cloud features. All cloud growth depends on the condensation of water resulting from air ...


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In that image you have displayed you are assuming a 2D flow i.e. in the x and z direction where is x is the direction along the mountain range which is parallel to the ocean(or sea) and the z is the vertical direction. This is a very simplistic assumption of mountain topography as depending on the context one can have mountain gaps and then the moisture ...


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As the continental crust is too buoyant (light) to be subducted, when two continents collide they smash against each other creating a mountain range, in this case the Himalayas. This process happen trough thrusting and folding of the plates, leading to something called lithospheric shortening. Which basically means that the plates (lithosphere is the stuff ...


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Examining two extreme cases, one very cold and the other very warm, the amount of precipitable water in the very cold one will be far less than that in the very warm one. Even fully saturated, the very cold air mass would need to be lifted quite high to form large enough ice crystals or water droplets to have enough mass to begin falling. Meanwhile, the ...


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I just want to add couple more points that are not covered in the excellent answer above by dplmmr. It is the fact that lenticular clouds do not form in the trough part of the wave because that corresponds to air that is warming but they do form in the crest of waves as air parcels condense. How does one obtain the trough and crest of the Mountain wave that ...


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I am pretty the real answer is in how well known the waterways are, which distorts perceptions of which side of the mountains really has more flowing. The rivers on the leeward side of mountains typically go on to travel large distances, and so as they continue, tributary waterways gradually merge, and so such rivers end up having gathered water from huge ...


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