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Although not exactly a textbook, I would highly recommend you to read Marcia Bjornerud's Timefulness (2018). It goes through all of Earth's history, including the atmosphere. It's short and kind of poetic, but backed by solid science. Her previous book, Reading the Rocks, seems somewhat similar (it's subtitle is The Autobiography of the Earth), but I did not ...


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I'll define a boreal forest as a place that Has trees, i.e., long-lived woody plants that are capable of growing at least ten meters tall and that grow both upward by extending new branches and outward by widening of the trunk. Amongst other things, this rules out times before ~380 million years ago, which was when the first trees formed. Has sufficient ...


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There was a sort of southern taiga on the northern fringes of Antarctica about 40 million years ago in the early tertiary, but this was probably killed off by the increasingly cold weather some ten million years later. The taiga as we know it today is in the northern hemisphere and is composed mainly of conifers (taiga is a Russian word), but you wouldn't ...


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