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The rivers transport most of the sediments to the coastal or marine basins where they accumulate. An exception are lacustrine basins, but most of world rivers sediments are deposited on shallow or deep marine basins. When the stack of sediments is large, listric faults develop, and the bottom layer get pushed down into the earth. This process is called ...


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I believe the author's was referring to phenomena like salt diapirs (where mobile salt deposits intrude into heavier overlying sediments). These produce low hills in the gulf coast region of the United States. The salt that is moving is not liquid, it is merely mobile. I do not believe the author of the book you reference was referring to sand and mud ...


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Molten rock must be a liquid, mobile rock is any rock capable of moving, sand and mud can be mobile.


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No, sediments do not sink into the earth because they are too light. They stay on the surface and over very long times they form the continents. But they can get buried under many km of other sediments as parts of the crust they're on subsides or is pushed over other parts. Thus they can get into pressure/temperatue conditions where diagenesis (see other ...


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In your question I think you are mixing up metamorphic conditions such as the conditions that gneiss forms from sedimentary rock with the formation of diapirs. Diapirs occur where a less dense layer of a relatively plastic rock has denser overlying formations create sufficient pressure so that the less dense substance deforms and rises over time. Diapirs ...


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The first department that comes to mind is obviously academia, i.e. faculty or research positions at universities. However, there are many other career paths available (hopefully: there are not enough academic positions for every student completing a Ph.D...). For volcanologists, there is actually a nice site called volcanologists outside academia. As the ...


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