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I make no claim to be an expert on Venus, and I welcome correction from those who are, but I think there's a misunderstanding in the question. "Venus... won't let any of the heat absorbed from the Sun out by radiation" is false. It must be, due to fairly fundamental physical laws. Now, I'm not sure whether any energy emitted from the surface of Venus ...


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As of 7 January 2020, the total area burnt by the fires in the whole of Australia is 8.4 million hectares (21 million acres; 84,000 square kilometres; 32,000 square miles. That is equivalent in area to the nations of Austria or the United Arab Emirates. Greater in area than the Czech Republic, Ireland or Sri Lanka. The vast majority of that has been on the ...


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Venus does radiate away heat, but not enough to prevent the surface and lower atmosphere heating to 460C. Too late to prevent overheating, it has already overheated. In the long term, its atmosphere will gradually leak away into space, reducing the present pressure of 90 Earth atmospheres. Exactly how far this process will have gone in 5 billion years' time ...


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In short, weird things happen when you combine things that don't combine in nature: the Earth is a perfect sphere the Earth is spinning on an axis Einstein's equivalence principle tells us that accelerations are all the same, no matter what's causing them. So you just add the acceleration vectors up. The (real) Earth has an equatorial bulge because a ...


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If the Earth were a perfect ball, which it is not, and had a perfectly smooth and even surface with no basins or irregularities, water would tend to move toward the equator, where it would form a bulge. Meanwhile, gravity would be pulling on this bulge and trying to drag it down, thus preventing it getting any higher and stopping the flow of water into it. ...


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