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44

Arctic ice, around the north pole floats on top of water. When it melts it does not add to sea level rises and likewise for other ice on water, as illustrated in this video and this video. Ice on land is a different matter. Ice on Greenland, Antarctic land & glaciers around the world will add to sea level rise because any melt water will eventually end ...


14

Because a lot of that ice is currently sitting on land. When it melts, it will go into the ocean. From the National Snow and Ice Data Center Page (NSIDC), Facts about glaciers: Presently, 10 percent of land area on Earth is covered with glacial ice, including glaciers, ice caps, and the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Glacierized areas cover over 15 ...


4

Loss of ice mass floating in oceans has negligible contribution to sea level rise. Loss of ice mass over land does contribute to sea level rise. It is the net balance (the difference) between flow of ice and meltwater into the oceans and the amount of snowfall in the catchment that determines the overall change to a glacier's ice mass and that determines if ...


3

Your question mixes a few independent issues. Two of the statements are undisputed: Yes, melt water has a smaller volume than the ice from which it comes. But obviously, that (smaller) volume of melt water still adds to the sea water and hence lets sea levels rise if the melted ice was on land before. Melting ice that is swimming does indeed not contribute ...


1

A few of us here have given eminently reasonable answers already, but I think I know where your confusion comes from. The argument "ice is less dense than water hence it must result in less volume if they melt in water" only works if the ice you are talking about is completely submerged in water. Recall the images of icebergs you've seen -- none is ...


1

Thermal expansion of the ocean is responsible for about half the sea level rise: First, warmer water expands, and this "thermal expansion" of the ocean has contributed about half of the 2.8 inches (7 centimeters) of global mean sea level rise we've seen over the last 25 years, Nerem said. Second, melting land ice flows into the ocean, also ...


1

The enzymes from maggots bred on plastic allowed ground up larva paste to also digest. I believe they were able to isolate and synthetically generate the enzymes. Seemed like they can really just apply and let sit, but they probably narrowed down thermal and pressure conditions for maximum enzyme effectiveness.


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