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This actually does happen, a feedback loop between the Himalayas and the Indian monsoon. The Indian Plate is actively shoving itself under the Eurasian Plate, creating the Himalayas. At the same time, monsoon storms come up against the southern side of the Himalayas. The high mountains enhance the storms' rainfall, and the mountains erode much more on ...


5

you are missing a big factor, the plates are not moving due to the momentum of an initial impulse. They are being actively moved by the push and pull of mantle convection. Much like how icebergs are pulled along by ocean currents. the iceberg analog however breaks down because icebergs melt before they can do much complex interaction, where as continental ...


5

The example of the East African Rift was given in a different answer. Splitting of mountain ranges in two becomes even more apparent as you go up north from there. The Red Sea between Egypt and Saudi Arabia is a young new spreading ocean, that cuts through Precambrian mountains. Further north from there, the Dead Sea is a combined transform–rift zone ...


5

Hot spots and ridges are two different things. Hot spots stay in one place while the earth crust above them drifts and thus create a line of dormant volcanoes, they are a point features so to say. Ridges are places where the mantle convection wells up and spreads in two directions, gently pulling the earth crust with them and creating new crust where the ...


4

Force is used to (try to) move objects apart. Energy is expended as the objects move and thereby separate. In a pure physics sense, until an object moves, absolutely no work energy is expended. You can push on a wall all you want with as much force as you want but, unless the wall moves, you do no work. A stress-strain curve of a materials is a map of force ...


4

Divergent boundaries are going to form where the crust is weak and thin, a divergent boundary siis very unlikely to form in an existing mountain range. Imagine trying to pull apart a lumpy cookie, is it going to break through the thick lumps or the thin areas. That's not saying a rift could not cut across a mountain range but it will be very unlikely, it ...


3

The jaguar is a close relative of the Asiatic leopard and must have had a common ancestor within the last 5 million years. The South American tapir is obviously closely related to the Malayan tapir and must also have had a common ancestor within he last 5 million years. While the first statement is more or less correct, the latter is not. The Asian and ...


3

The subduction zones are more easily spotted by the phenomena they cause in the subsurface than their features on the surface. I found this schematic image which shows almost all the features, from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318684905_The_Nahuel_Niyeu_basin_A_Cambrian_forearc_basin_in_the_eastern_North_Patagonian_Massif : So what you see is ...


3

The pacific has already lost part its spreading center, north america has been pushed over it.. A few tiny non-contiguous plates like the Juan de fuca plate is all that is left of the east pacific plate. in places like the san-andreas the north american plates has complete overridden the spreading center. In truth there are four possible predictions for ...


3

Just to reiterate some of the points previously said here: Continental crust fragments that collided are sticky. This results in mountain belts that essentially "glue" the two crusts together. Subduction of a plate that contains both oceanic and continental crusts underneath continental crust will inevitably lead the the complete loss of the oceanic crust, ...


2

They don't really share a plate, now they did for a long time and the boundary between them is rather recent but they are separate plates. BUT this was only discovered recently, recently as in 2012, so older references treat them as the same plate. The "indo" in indo-australian plate is being dropped from more modern references. The two plates are moving ...


2

If you want to know about what happens with diverging plates, the best example to look at is the East African Rift Valley. An existing plate is forced to split apart by a mantle plume or plumes, and this is likely to be accompanied by volcanism as is the case in East Africa. It is theoretically possible for the rift to cut through mountains, and this seems ...


2

Subduction zones are only observable indirectly through the typical volcanos in these regions (stratovulcanos like Krakatau or Pinatubo on the surface of the continental plate). Another form of typical subduction volcanos are the "Petit Spots" only described for the first time in 2001 by geologists from Japan. These litle volcanos appear under the water ...


2

hot spots help/control how spreading centers form but they are not what keeps them going. If you push on a thin amorphous material perpendicular to the surface they tend to crack/split at three cracks roughly ~120 degrees to each other. If you push at several points close enough to each other these cracks will tend to link up as long lines with 120 degree ...


2

It’s relative motion that matters. So in your case, I assume one side is moving faster than another, so you would have a right lateral or left lateral transform fault depending on which side is moving faster. It’s “significance” would depend on the amount of relative difference in motion and, as usually defined, its potential impact on man. Note that if ...


2

Most likely. I say that because it is heavily supposed that Mars, which is now tectonically stable, was active in the past. The reason why it has reached equilibrium is still a matter of discussion, and its tectonic history is merely hypothetical. But right away I'd say that the reason why Earth's tectonic activity could end converges on the reason why Mars,...


1

Rock is dense, is a good insulator, and usually has very high specific heat capacity; the crust is also kilometers thick. The combination of these qualities means that it takes a very long time, even geologically speaking, for crustal blocks to melt completely in the mantle. This is exacerbated by the fact that the mantle, especially the shallow layers close ...


1

Both of the processes you describe occur; in some cases such as the Himalayas the plates are not subducted and a moving plate, in this case the Indian plate, bulldozes the continental crust ahead of it into a high mountain range. In most cases, such as the Pacific rim for example, subduction is the norm. Where there is subduction there are usually many ...


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I do not think there is one name for the area. Rather it is a region with multiple plates, namely the Timor Plate, the eastern portion of the Banda Sea Plate, the Maoke Plate and the Woodlark Plate, all of which lie on the Arafura shelf which lies upon the Australian Plate. The Timor trough, Tanimbar Trough and Aru Trough would cover the western portion of ...


1

Reading this question, I'm not sure if you realize what an isotherm is - in this case, imagine peeling rock from the surface of the earth until you reached a temperature of 1300 degrees Celsius. Now, in some areas, such as mid ocean ridges, you wouldn't have to peel back much rock at all, perhaps only a few dozen kilometers. Whereas in regions of old, ...


1

I think the mechanisms that you're looking for are subduction, paired with the "stickiness" of continental crust. The subduction of oceanic crust under continental crust inevitably creates a net movement of crustal material toward a continental plate. Any oceanic plate that is carrying continental material will therefore always drag that continent toward ...


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