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What you are asking about is called "Managed Aquifer Recharge" It has been successfully employed in some situations but depends greatly on the geology of the area. The aquifer needs to be relatively shallow with permeable sediments between it and the surface. If the sediments are not permeable (e.g. clay rich or solid rock) The water won't flow down to the ...


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Your 6-hour rainfall data represent the depth of water fallen in 6 hours. In order to have the average rainfall intensity in m/s corresponding to that interval of time, you have to divide the rainfall depth for the number of seconds in the time interval or for mm/s you multiply for 1000/21600. If you want the intensity in m/h you divide for 6 hours. You have ...


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Try to read something about Köppen climate classification. This classification among other things tries to distinguish between rainy and dry season for many areas. So, scientist needs to know the distribution of precipitation. Another possibility could be indices described in this scientific article on the ResearchGate.


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I wouldn't say that low humidity equals more rain. The key to the conundrum is the Hadley cell. There are two of them, one on either side of the equator, and they are huge air masses which encircle the globe. What happens is that the equator is heated by the sun, and this huge mass of humid, water laden, tropical air rises to a height of about 7 or 8 miles. ...


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