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No, in fact moisture rates increase. Because more warmth means more oceanic evaporation. Increasing humidity. Even local climates that are tyipcally dry accumulate more moisture. Africa during the Holocene had lakes the Size of US states, the Sahara was an alluvial plain with grasses and wetlands. research on Australia Holocene wetness data. https://...


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If true, this would be an example of a teleconnection affected by climate change. However the explanation of extreme drought and extreme precipitation, both as results of global warming, is generally considered to have the "opposite direction": higher temperatures lead to increased evaporation rates and to clouds which store more water before they ...


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Increased air temperature tends to increase the rate of moisture transfer, firstly because at a given relative humidity and pressure warmer air has a higher absolute humidity and is carrying more water. Secondly warmer air causes more evaporation off the water and land. There are however a couple of issues that are becoming increasing apparent, Climate ...


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