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There's no official distinction between a river and a creek, both of which are categories of streams. As an example, consider Pine Creek in Pennsylvania and Po River in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. Pine Creek is 87.2 miles long and has a flow rate that ranges between 40 to 30000 cubic feet per second. Po River on the other hand is 1.9 miles long and has a ...


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Looking at a map of the region, from the Indus Water Treaty Wikipeadia page, The Sutluj, Ravi and Beas rivers could have easily been called the southern rivers of the system. With the partitioning of British India into India and Pakistan being effectively an east-west partition, it was most likely convenient to refer to those three rivers as being the ...


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I'm studying Earth Science right now, and I found conflicting reporting re: the formation of the Grand Canyon; whether it was formed singularly by the Colorado River over millions of years, or if it was formed by other processes with the river only filling into it relatively recently. Yes, it was formed by other processes with the river only excavating into ...


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What is the current capacity of the soil and overburden. This will depend on the history of rainfall for the previous year or six. How fast can that surface absorb water? If you get 7 inches of rain in one hour (near my brother's house in N.M.) you get a lot more run off than if you get that same 7 inches in 7 days. I'm not sure how evaporation potential ...


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Calculating river flow from rainfall - evaporation is a simplification. Firstly you are assuming that you can accurately measure rainfall, then that theoretical estimates of evaporation are correct which, given how much land cover and vegetation vary, is unlikely. Next consider the pathway from raindrop hitting the soil to the river. It's clearly not ...


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