80

The water in any river draining the sea is infinitely recycle-able (from rain replenishment), whereas the salt from any terrestrial source is not. So salty rivers, if any, won't exist permanently. Saltwater lakes gain their salinity precisely because they have no outlet, so salt just gets concentrated by evaporation. I don't think there are any truly saline ...


31

The already accepted answer is already covering the "real" answer as far as I'm concerned, and while you won't find many (any?) saline rivers in the traditional sense, we do have underwater "rivers" that kiiiiind of but not quite fit the bill. They're not saline rivers as I expect you envision, but I figure they could be an interesting "by the way though" ...


25

The Pecos River in Texas, USA may arguably fit the description of a "saltwater river". A point of argument is what is considered to be "saltwater". For comparison, here are some bodies of water and their salinity. 35,000 ppm Pacific and Atlantic Ocean 13,000-23,000 ppm Black Sea 12,500 ppm Caspian Sea 10,000 ppm Baltic Sea Note though, that salinity ...


23

In a nutshell: The instrument measures microwave radiances (after calibration) If we know the sea surface temperature, we can use radiances to calculate emissivity. The emissivity at 1.4 GHz is itself a function of near-surface ocean salinity. However, in reality, it's more complicated, because there are other factors that come into the equation, such as ...


22

Water from the Caspian sea, with a salinity of 1.2%, is constantly flowing into Garabogazköl, where the water eventually evaporates and leaves the salt behind. Of course, the situation is not indefinitely stable, as the depression is eventually going to be filled with salt. But at the time writing, water is still flowing like a river through the very narrow ...


17

Here in New York City we have a salt "river". It is called the "East River" and it separates part of Long Island (Brooklyn and Queens) from the island of Manhattan and the mainland (The Bronx). Indeed it looks a lot like a salt river: From a hydrology perspective it is not a river tho, it is actually a saltwater estuary.


12

I live near a river named Salz, flowing both warm and salty on the north slope of the Pyrenees south of Carcassonne. In historical times it was boiled dry for salt. See Les Sources de Salz


11

There are salt water rivers in different places of the world where ground water flows in contact with salt layers. There is a river in Catalonia named Ribera Salada (meaning salty river in Catalan). My translation from Catalan Wikipedia: It gets its name because one of its originating currents - Fred river - comes from sources in Triassic lands with a ...


9

Salinity and temperature both affects the density of sea water. When water with a fixed salinity cools down, it becomes heavier and sinks. In the same way, when vapor or ice removes water from sea water, the remains is more saline and heavier. Thermohaline circulation can work as you describe. Surface water in the tropics is saline, due to evaporation, but ...


9

There is an area with several salt rivers and wide salt streams that exists in Russia - it's in Yakutia (Sakha Republic), part of Siberia. Water of Solyanka River (flowing in to the great Lena River) contains 21 g of salt per liter, some neighboring streams can contain up to 70 g of salt per liter of their water... According to science, millions ...


9

Here in Western Australia we have many salt water streams running through farmland affected by dry land salinity. It's a huge problem where land cleared for agriculture has experienced rising water tables effectively bringing salt to the surface. This salt is washed into the creeks by rain and these streams are essentially salt saturated - far saltier than ...


8

The Werra – a natural river – had and up to a certain degree still has at least a brackish water body. A portion of the salt content of the river comes from natural leaching, the greater part is passed by nearby potash industry. (Heringen with the Werra between mine and city. The picture was shot from the Monte Kali) The legal threshold value in the 1940s ...


8

Warm water does hold more salt - at saturation, but seawater isn't even close to saturation. Surface sea water gets warm, starts to evaporate (hence clouds) and therefore gets denser. So it sinks to the ocean floor, where it cools down to about 4 deg Celsius, and gets denser still. But it still is a very long way from being saturated with salt, so 'how much ...


7

The composition of the Dead Sea is quite unlike most other salt lakes, and is not at all like sea-water. Compare the concentrations, in grams per litre: The potassium, bromine and magnesium are all hugely enriched relative to seawater, so clearly, it is not just a case of evaporation of residual seawater from the time of isolation of the Dead Sea. In fact, ...


7

Beyond the answers above, here is a small river near Berca, Romania, where active mud volcanism and salt diapirism are widespread, explaining the high salinity of this water. Salty river. Note box for scale. (My own picture, geotagged)


7

A good chronometer is one that satisfies the following conditions: We know exactly how much it had of something when it began We know exactly the rate of the accumulation of the thing, and the rate is constant. For example, U-Pb dating in zircon is an excellent chronometer. We know exactly how much Pb is in zircon when it crystallises (= none) and we know ...


6

There is also a hypersaline periodic water flow, which although a few times more saline than sea water, I might be hesitant to call a river. However, due to its high salinity (well above everything else mentioned here), I thought it was worth mentioning. It is called Blood Falls. It is the periodic draining of a brine reservoir under the Tylor glacier in ...


6

Here in Norway we are mighty proud of "Saltstraumen"(meaning Salt Stream) Again, not technically a river, but a narrow strait connecting the ocean to a wider fjord behind it. As the tides go in and out, Saltstraumen does too. It is the world's strongest tidal current. Wikipedia link.


5

There are specific rivers that sometimes flow inward called Tidal Bores. A great example of a Tidal Bore is the Amazon River.


5

Świna (note that while english wikipedia lists it as a river, both german and polish wikipedias are more ambiguous, for example polis wiki descirbes it as a "strait" of the Baltic sea): Świna (Wikipedia).


5

Adding to Sabre Tooth's summary: In addition to weathering of felsic volcanics as ST describes, another aspect that has received attention over the years has been direct input to the salar (or playa) from hot spring sources. The idea being that the lithium is coming in as magmatic, not just meteoric water. There is no question that hot springs are ...


5

A low salinity layer that is associated with low density (assuming the same temperature) will remain on top of the water column. As such the water will be able to get warmer and the difference in salinity and temperature will make it even more difficult to mix it down with the rest of the water column. So the combination of high temperature and low salinity ...


5

The answer to the main question is that we are capable of forecasting salinity 100 years into the future. The more relevant question might be how well are we currently forecasting salinity. First, lets look at what we know about how salinity is currently changing. Global salinity is the result of the balance between surface freshwater flux (evaporation ...


5

I think the simplest answer is through water mass formation, the resulting thermohaline circulation, mixing caused by wind predominantly in shallow regions, and through downwelling processes. The heat exchanged with the atmosphere in the surface layers determine the temperature of the near-surface water. From there, mixing (caused by wind, for instance) will ...


5

Complementary to the points about salinity emphasised by TomO and S Verhoef, one more point to emphasise is the role of deep ocean convection. You may have in mind this picture of water sinking because it gets heavy, which is not quite wrong, but you get a more accurate picture if you see that the water column down to about 3000 meter deep is convectively ...


4

Writing about the San Francisco Bay salt ponds, Dr R. J. Rusay notes: Due to variable algal concentrations, vivid colors, from pale green to bright red are created. The color indicates the salinity of the ponds. Micro-organisms change their hues as the salinity of the pond increases. In low to mid-salinity ponds, green algae are predominant. In middle ...


4

The difference between a lake and sea can simply be size and what humans desire to call it. You can think of the Dead Sea as a giant lake if you wish. The salt in the seas comes from rain running on top of rocks, such as mountains, and carrying the minerals, which contain salt, with them into the sea. In rivers, the water runs continuously and the ...


4

There is a limit to how much of a given salt can be dissolved into water, this is known as it's solubility and it's dynamic based upon how much of any particular ion is already present. Once concentrations exceed the local solubility of a given compound precipitation occurs, this can be seen in the modern Mediterranean basin with the precipitation of calcium ...


3

From my country there is indeed a saltwater river in the north western state of Rajasthan - Luni river. It is not salty from the point of it's origin but does become salty as it flows downstream. Here is a more complete description of the Luni river - Luni River basin facts. Looking at this book - Contributions to the ecology of halophytes one wonders ...


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