Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
14

No, lava does not push the plates apart. The mid-ocean ridge basalt is passively filling the space left by the plates moving apart. Plate motion is driven by gravity (image by Vic DiVenere at Columbia; see note below): There are thought to be two main effects at play: ridge push, and slab pull. We don't know much about their relative importance, but it ...


8

The nomenclature is confusing and recent studies have shown that among mid-ocean ridge basalts (generally called MORBs) that normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (NMORB) should reflect the statistically usual composition while enhanced MORB (EMORB) and depleted MORB (DMORB) should reflect end-members of the MORB population. Gale et. al 2013 proposes the use of ...


6

To add to a already complete answer by kwinkunks, perhaps one of the most surprising things about plate tectonics to geophysicists was the fact that in some cases extension in the lithosphere (rifting) is a direct cause of subduction zones. When the idea of subduction zones was finally formalized (~1969) most geophysicists expected all subduction zones to be ...


4

Helium is formed through the radioactive decay of uranium 238, uranium 235 and Thorium 232. A helium atom is an alpha particle that has collected electrons. The only way that helium is produced on Earth is by such radioactive decay deep underground. Generally, the helium travels along cracks until it reaches a subterranean cavern where it accumulates. ...


4

Ah yes, this is a very good question. The formation of back-arc spreading centers is an open research problem, and happens to be the main topic of my office mate's dissertation! While these aren't exactly "clean" back-arcs, the formation of them is similar, I'm fairly sure. The formation of back-arcs is caused by "Trench Roll-back". Trench Rollback is ...


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