7

Was the Earth seafloor always carved with the numerous geological features that we see today? Absolutely not. The seafloor is where plate tectonics is starts and ends. The seafloor is extremely dynamic and is incredibly young compared the age of the Earth. Most of the seafloor is less than 200 million years old. The very oldest oceanic crust is in the ...


6

As the other answer suggests, these are sonar surveys of the ocean depths. But the answer is a bit more complicated. The vast majority of the ocean floor has never been mapped. We really only know about the water depth because the water above the sea floor is lighter than if it were rocks. So a deep ocean produces less gravity than a shallow one. And, ...


5

This is an excellent question, and a topic about which there is a lot of literature. In addition to the volume linked above, I can also recommend: Geological Society of London Special Publication 216: http://sp.lyellcollection.org/content/216/1 Another good place to start is the extensive body of work done by Chris Morley and Pieter van Rensbergen that ...


5

There are about 3 tonnes of uranium in every cubic kilometre of seawater, but in the general circulation there is no mechanism to concentrate the uranium, except perhaps low-level adsorption on manganese nodules in some parts of the sea bed. To concentrate the uranium you need some mechanism to transport it, and some other mechanism to make it precipitate. ...


4

There is no reason you couldn't have uranium deposits in the continental shelf. Certain types of deposits wouldn't occur or be likely to persist in that environment but other types such as those in Archean metasediments likely could be found. As pure speculation, I can envision formation of deposits similar to unconformity or roll-front deposits where deep-...


4

Yes and no. Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico have sedimentary materials and rocks at the top, but seabed sensu stricto is composed by sediments and not by rocks. Oceanic Crust is composed by basalts and gabbros, both igneous rocks as you notice, and sedimentary materials above. We know that because of drillings and fossilized ophiolites: Source: ...


2

Supplementing Wolfgang's answer, here's a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration story that talks about the appearance of ocean-bottom artifacts: With legions of people around the world now exploring the seafloor, many are noticing locations along the ocean bottom marked by mysterious formations of grid-like artifacts. These formations ...


2

SOI operates Falkor, which also broadcasts live video. They stream via youtube, currently, as does OET. https://schmidtocean.org/technology/live-from-rv-falkor/ Occasionally other operations, such as Woods Hole, will operate telepresence cruises, but these three are consistent operators in the space as they have dedicated ROVs and satellite equipment/...


1

The easiest and larger improvement in accuracy you can implement is switching from the non-differential single frequency GPS measurement to a double frequency and/or differential GPS measurements. That usually takes down the error of single measurements from a few meters to a few tens of centimetres or less. The GPS systems that are within cell phones, ...


1

I suspect the answer is no. The reason is that underwater constructions typically are supposed to be air- and water-tight, and to have strength enough to resist pressure differences. Biorock looks like it is naturally porous, so it would not be particularly good at holding water out. While the compression strength is like concrete, you really want to ...


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