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Before the transform process of the San Andreas Fault zone we know today, there was indeed a subduction zone event taking place in this same region near now coastal California during the late Jurassic to late Cretaceous periods. Today the city of San Francisco physically represents the aftermath of the ancient clash of mighty tectonic titans as the city and ...


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If you need a plausible west coast disaster, consider a fraction km meteor about 1500 km off shore. This would do two things: A: The Tsunami would hit most of the coast over a span of 4-6 hours. B: It would rain sea water initially from the splash,killing a lot of vegetation. C: It would wreck (or at least sharply reduce) crops throughout the northern ...


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The west coast has had 25 years of preparation to plan for a possible 9.0 above richter scale event. Earthquakes in the industrialized world are not as substantial a deal despite the potential of infrastructure for damage. In the third world where building standards are poor, potential for catastrophic physical damage and deaths in the thousands is more ...


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Never say never, but it's unlikely. Every geological fault is not uniform. There are bumps and snags of varying size and strength along its three intentional surfaces. As once fault surface moves over the other some of the snags can break off resulting in localized quakes at the site of the breakages. Similarly, for very strong, robust snags (protuberances) ...


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