19

For very quick visual comparison I would use Cube Browser or ncview together with a command line tool like the Climate Data Operators. For quick production of nice looking graphics (and animations) Panoply really makes good job. For further analysis or special graphics keep following your approach and script with things like MATLAB, Python (e.g. with Iris), ...


17

The writers of netCDF, UNIDATA, maintain a pretty extensive list of visualisation software on the netCDF website. It even mentions an Excel add-in, for the masochistic, presumably. Over the years, I've found Ferret to be reliable with CF compliant files (and non-compliant ones, for that matter) and useful for interactive quick looks and simple ...


15

Skew-T Log-P diagrams can be plotted in most mathmatics software. I have seen examples in Matlab (and by proxy Octave), GrADS, NCL, IDL and I have my own code in Python that generates Skew-T plots. There are also some programs such as NSHARP and BUFKIT that are more full featured. You can also find websites that plot forecast soundings such as twisterdata ...


12

I haven't seen the video you linked to, but from personal experience GPlates is pretty good. It's open-source and runs on Windows, Linux and MacOS X.


12

I second ncview for taking a quick look at NetCDF files. I would also recommend trying Unidata's Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). It is great for overlaying geophysical fields in 3-D from different sources. Besides NetCDF, it supports many other formats. It also comes with a pre-loaded listing of various observational and model data repositories through ...


11

Normally I use the following softwares for a quick view of my NetCDF files: NASA Panoply (Panoply netCDF, HDF and GRIB Data Viewer): java based, very good in opening HDF, NetCDF, GRIBs... CDO functions as shaded, contour, etc. (very basic but useful from command-line) MATLAB and R with their basic functions


11

Just to add my point of view; Using ncks you can do many things, i.e. differentiate, get ratio, extract some vars, slice on the dimension etc.. If you want to make some binary operations on netcdf files consider ncbo. For huge files I prefer to cut down what I want at the first place, it does opendap remote as well. Hate matlab so I moved to NCL (NCAR) ...


10

A CDL file is basically a text output from a netcdf file. If you want to know the contents of a netcdf file but don't have the time (or ability) to use programs built to read/write netcdf, you can use the simple text output of "ncdump" and then read/write it with a basic text editor. You can also use "ncgen" to regenerate a netcdf file based on the new CDL ...


10

I think the best option for sediment transport modeling is the Community Sediment Transport Modeling System (CSTMS) package that was developed for ROMS. CSTMS was created by a group of sediment transport modelers lead by the USGS. One of the many benefits is that it is open-source and, thus, free. The model was designed for realistic simulations of processes ...


10

Yes, there were many model coupling projects in the past, as well as many ongoing coupling projects in the present and near future. The main motivation behind model coupling is the need for the interactive feedback processes between two or more separate physical systems, for example, atmosphere and ocean. Historically, these models have been developed ...


10

Coupler software (e.g. OASIS, MCT, C-Coupler) is frequently used to combine these different components of earth system models. Of course interfacing models with each other using these couplers or other methods always needs some technical work and sometimes also some algorithmic work. Therefore the number of model combinations will always be limited.


9

+1 for GPlates, but if you happen to be an ArcGIS user (I was once, but I'm better now), then the PaleoGIS plugin is pretty good. Skimming through their material I can't tell if there's any other way to run it, but I don't think there is.


7

Large parts of Delft3D - including, I think, the sediment transport module - are available in an open source form. The GUI is not currently open source, but (a) Deltares have been offering licences for this for free for academic use; (b) if they are no longer doing this, it is entirely possible to use the software without the GUI. FVCOM also has a sediment ...


6

Using Matlab, you can do ncgeodataset (http://code.google.com/p/nctoolbox/wiki/ncgeodataset) to subsample the netcdf without having to download large datasets. For instance, nc = ncgeodataset('http://thredds.jpl.nasa.gov/thredds/dodsC/ncml_aggregation/OceanTemperature/ghrsst/aggregate__ghrsst_JPL_OUROCEAN-L4UHfnd-GLOB-G1SST_OI.ncml'); gvar = nc....


5

Go to the user preferences. From there you will be able to choose different formats and data options. If you choose netCDF, you will be able to read these filetypes with most map readers. For Python, you can use netCDF4-python.


4

You might try the RockFab package. I am not a structural geologist but I use other R packages for geological endevours. Documentation.


4

Actually, there are plenty of alternative DC Inversion software; I hate using res2dinv; unfortunately it's relatively easy to get into. I would have much preferred ZondRes2D for it's user experience. Look up DC2DInvRes (Resistivity.net), and BERT by Thomas Gunther. You may need to contact Thomas for Bert codes, however it's all done in Python and easily ...


4

You can convert the image to NetCDF data using gdal_translate. The command line looks something like: gdal_translate -ot Int16 -of netCDF jpeg_filename nc_filename You can use ncl example: click here


4

The same as scottlittle, but you can use also McIdas V. It also can read nedcdf files and also is a free software. http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/mcidas/software/v/documentation.html


4

While I don't know the specifics of ocean modeling, unless there there is a "standard" in which nodes are organized and written (Ie X,Y,Z), there will always be coding required. Furthermore, the way a a data file is written always depends on how tasks in the model are delegated to the processor: Is the model designed to be run on a personal PC or a Beowulf ...


3

You may want to investigate the Delivery package available from http://www-old.dpr.csiro.au/StochasticSeismicInversion/ 'Delivery is an open-source, trace-based Bayesian seismic inversion code for use in oil reservoir characterisation at the early development and appraisal stage. See the Computers and Geosciences paper for most of the details, and the ...


3

OpendTect may do this, however getting to that stage would be a painful experience. Petrel can do this very easily, however, that is not anywhere near free... If you're a student, your department may have access to a few decent programs to achieve this. If you could find out what you have available, we might be of more help!


3

It is far too complex a process to estimate surface irradiances utilising satellite data. No software takes just satellite images as input and gives out irradiances. I am pasting link to an article that describes algorithm to convert geostationary satellite measurements to surface reaching solar irradiance. Gadhavi et al., 2008; doi: 10.1029/2007JD009308 ...


3

I can address the Res2DInv. The answer unfortunately is no. The only freely available Resistivity Inversion software is R2 or R3 from Lancaster University. http://www.es.lancs.ac.uk/people/amb/Freeware/R2/R2.htm. This software is only free for students and projects that don't have a commercial component. The author of the software charges about as much as ...


3

I believe that Leapfrog 3D will do this. They have academic licenses. I also seem to recall that Intrepid Geomodeller does what you are after. Both of these options are probably overkill though.


2

Packages as Seismic Unix and Madagascar represent a different philosophy than commercial products. The packages are open source, so any user can look at the code, understand how it works (or why it doesn't) and even produce reproducible research so other geophysicists can test the results and use the methods. A great way to learn about seismic processing ...


2

Here is an example using contourf. The trick is in sampling the 3D arrays appropriately: x=linspace(0,pi,20); y=linspace(0,pi,10); t=0:10:120; [X3d,Y3d,T3d]=meshgrid(x,y,t); [X2d,T2dx]=meshgrid(x,t); [Y2d,T2dy]=meshgrid(y,t); dat3d=7*sin(X3d)+5*cos(Y3d)+T3d/max(T3d(:))+rand(size(X3d)); dat2dx=7*sin(X2d)+5*cos(y(5))+T2dx/max(T2dx(:))+rand(size(X2d)); % ...


2

I typed in the commands as shown using your data in SAC. I've uploaded my result. The plot window shows the result of the commands run in the highlighted red area. Is this what you are trying to do? The plot xlim is set from 1750 s to 2700 s.


2

Your best bet is probably OpendTect. It's not quite what you asked for. OpendTect is a desktop application and does not use HTML/JavaScript for display. It is dual licensed; the free version is licensed under the GPL. It will read wells and seismic no problem, but I'm not sure about FMI in the free version. Agile started G3.js, a JavaScript library based ...


1

There are several references to refraction tools in the Wikipedia page for free geophysics software: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_free_geophysics_software


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