10

So let's get through some definitions. I will not discuss the derivations of this, but you can look this up, if you want to in the source I provided. We find ourselves in a porous medium, so we will have always some volume filling factor $\Theta$ of water in rock. (copyright K. Roth, Heidelberg University) Then we can start with the hydraulic ...


6

A frost-gley is a waterlogged permafrost soil. IOW, a gleysol that has undergone cryoturbation.


4

Dry down is mainly dependent on the speed where a local water storage would be depleted, considering those components extracted from the simplified water balance equation water input (precipitation) local drainage capacity (runoff, infiltration, percolation) evapotranspiration storage change and capacity (pores in the rock and soil) To generalize your ...


4

I assume you mean sensors that measure volumetric soil water content. The answer will depend on the amount of precipitation and the permeability of the soil. Soils don't reach full saturation in some climates - especially coarse texture soils. I would say that if the soil water content reaches a maximum value that persists for a period of time after large ...


3

Okay Water Holding Capacity(WHC) is how much water the soil has in it at total saturation, if you filled every soil pore space completely with water. Field Capacity(FC), if I remember correctly from first year, is shorthand for the water that stays in the soil after surface runoff and groundflow has ceased; the sub-saturation "ground state" of the moist ...


3

The other answers are correct that you need to know the soil depth to convert from mass units (kg m-2) to volumetric units (m3 m-3). However, when comparing these variables you should also be aware that satellite soil moisture is typically measured only over the top few centimetres of soil. Total column soil moisture from a climate model will typically be ...


2

If you're after "basic" academic work, I suggest the following 2003 textbook from the Utah State University entitled, "Rainfall Runoff Processes", chapter 2: Runoff Generation Mechanisms It looks like a pretty good compendium of what you're looking for with easy-to-understand text and clear diagrams. Further detail, if needed, can be found by hunting down ...


2

Your method looks OK, however, water density varies with temperature. Not knowing exactly what your aim is or how accurate/fussy you want to be, you may want to consider using the density of water for its temperature rather than accepted average of $1000 kg/m^3$.


2

The SMAP includes both an active L-band synthetic aperture radar and a passive microwave radiometer. Any object above a temperature of absolute 0 will emit thermal radiation over a wide range of frequencies. The spectrum of this radiation can vary from that of a theoretical "black body" depending on its physical properties, especially the dielectric ...


1

In practice you really don't want to plant a field that is even close to capacity. Doing so will result in ruts, soil compaction, breakdown of soil structure and a large increase in fuel consumption. One of the advantages of zero tillage systems is the ability to get out on the field in wetter (earlier in spring) conditions. All those roots help reduce ...


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