5

I am not not an expert in meteorology, but do study the chemistry involved in these types of events. My understanding is that the folds in the tropopause generally occur below the front of the jet stream, when the potential vorticity is strong enough to transport stratospheric air down through the tropopause/inversion. Please see the relevant quote from Q....


4

There are a few things that come into play when you talk about the radiative forcing of clouds, or their effect on the climate budget. "Cloud" is a pretty wide-sweeping definition. Scientists are still trying to fully understand and quantify these effects. Clouds do not vary only in where they are in the atmosphere but also in their phase (ice versus mixed ...


3

Truth be told, there is no such place. The atmosphere is a fluid, and a fluid moves. If a fluid did not move, it would not be a fluid. Proof of concept- If you exhale, the carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other materials that form your breath would need to move, otherwise you would asphyxiate. That movement can be classified as wind, therefore wind exists. ...


2

There are two main points to make here. The first point is that UV radiation is entering the stratosphere from above (ignoring angular dependencies and scattering), so is preferentially absorbed by ozone higher in the stratosphere. This is a form of the Beer-Lambert law, which leads to greater absorption higher in the stratosphere. The second point is ...


1

Not just the south pole, but 'Ridge A' and many other parts of the high Antarctic Plateau, at or about 4000 metres altitude, are generally recognized as being the least windy. Otherwise, there are a many parts of the high pressure belts at about +/- 30 degrees which have little wind for most of the year. These tend to be very dry deserts where occasional ...


1

This presentation mentions "Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs)", and specifically mentions a number of AMVs, which separately cover the globe (GOES AMVs ±60N, plus polar AMVs from MODIS/AVHRR/VIIRS, and a combined product from UW CIMSS) but says that are all only 3 layers. That presentation is talking about producing a more global, higher resolution product, ...


1

If these were polar stratospheric clouds, that could explain a brighter than normal sky either before sunrise or after sunset. The higher the clouds are, the more lead/lag time you will have to observe the phenomena before the sun comes into view. The reason for this is simply that the clouds are in direct line-of-sight with both you and the sun, but you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible