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The best way to learn about rock types is to handle rock specimens guided by an experienced geologist. By handling rock specimens you get to feel the weight of the rock, its roughness or smoothness or if it feels slippery, soapy, glassy, firm or crumbly. Is it weak or strong? You will also be able to better see the colours in the rock, the sizes of the ...


6

I'd suggest to get out and do some mapping. Get a map, look for local outcrops and mark them on your map. Try to find the same type of rocks or unit in more than one location and try to connect them. Compare it with published maps and see if it makes sense. Then start to think about the reasons why the units are located as they are and read a bit about ...


6

Go to a good geological museum and spend time there. Alas, many such museums have dumbed down, and are not as informative as they used to be (Natural History Museum in Kensington, London - I'm writing about you!). Go walkabout with local rockhound / geology clubs. There are always geologists trying to impress with their knowledge. Get a geological map of a ...


3

Here's an idea: You can use dark chocolate and white chocolate. Use a grater to create "sediments": layers of alternating grated dark and white chocolate. Now heat them up just before melting so you can stick them together with pressure, preserving the layered structure. Now fold them. There's your "metamorphic" rock. Then, just melt the entire thing to ...


2

There are at least 2 books that come to mind: National Geographic Readers: Rocks and Minerals (2012), a richly illustrated guide for kids. Ultimate Explorer Field Guide: Rocks and Minerals (2016) by Nancy Honovich, a guide focussed on getting kids outside, looking at rocks in their backyards and on the camping. Considering you're in the UK, afterwards I'd ...


1

What a nice question! There is not a whole lot of literature on geology aimed at children but it is a great subject to get interested in (OK, I am biased). A quick Amazon search suggests "The Street beneath our Feet" by Charlotte Guillard is very well thought of as a starter - and she is an English author. Of more grown up books which could provide ...


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