5

High pressure air near the surface encourages sinking air. Air near the surface that is isolated from the atmosphere higher in the sky tends to move slower. This is because the ground doesn't move (other than the rotation rate that both the ground and air are moving at). So the friction of that ground slows air near the surface. Usually air mixes higher ...


2

It's not the earth's core temperature per se that matters, but rather the amount of heat that flows from the core to the surface. Just like holding a cup of hot coffee - if the mug is insulated, it's fine, but if it's just thin metal, then your fingers will get burnt. The flux of heat through the surface of the solid earth is less than ~0.5 W/m$^{2}$. The ...


2

This is typical of the winter weather in the Netherlands (I live there) and Belgium as well. In a period with maximum temperatures below 0, whether it's going to be cold or very cold in the night depends mainly on two things: the presence of any clouds which preserve the 'heat' from the day, and the presence of wind (especially from the south) which ...


2

By that principle, I would expect water from the troposphere to diffuse into the stratosphere, where water content is significantly lower than in the former. You are forgetting that water is not nearly as volatile as are the long-lived gases that comprise the bulk of the Earth's atmosphere. Water's triple point temperature is 0.01° C. The triple point ...


1

All weather agencies record ‘ambient temperature’— how warm the air is in the shade and sheltered from the wind. This is done by placing weather recording instruments in a Stevenson Screen. The height above ground that Stevenson Screens are placed is between 1.25 and 2 m (4 ft 1 in and 6 ft 7 in). By using this approach weather readings from around the world ...


1

This Skeptical Science article explains that geothermal is very small, $0.09W/m^2$, compared to radiant heat flows. It also does not change much in time, so it can be neglected in climate change calculations. For an airless planet the equilibrium temperature $T$ can be calculated from $$ F=\sigma T^4$$where $F$ is the average absorbed heat flux at the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible