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The two factions have different points to prove. The nuclear catastrophe faction have to prove that a nuclear war would be a disaster of the first magnitude, which I don't doubt for a moment, while the global warming faction have to prove that the current warming episode is caused by burning fossil fuels. Forest fires are fairly neutral in that whatever ...


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Your assumption that "smoke" in the sense of your question, i.e. the emissions from a burning event, consists only of CO2 is wrong. At least it is not the only factor at play. During the events you mention, not only CO2 is emitted but also loads of other components such as dust, soot, sulphates and many other things. Especially the particulate components ...


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The general term isotherm refers to a line of equal or constant temperature, while isothere refers more specifically to lines of constant average summer temperature. For what it's worth, coming from a background in forecasting and research centered around active weather rather than longer-term climate, isotherm is an extremely commonly-used term in weather ...


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Think about how hot a compost pile can get (hot enough to catch fire). That is basically what is happening at the bottom of the pond over a longer period of time as the decaying matter from the summer decomposes as in a methane digester. Also, the ice (and snow) forming around the edges at the top act as an insulator. And since ice floats, it creates a ...


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Did global temperature increase or drop in the last 2 years? Before I answer the question, I need to add the caveat that climate change does not say that every year will be warmer than the previous one. Events such as El Ninos and La Ninas can make the global temperature spike or drop in any one year. The Pacific Ocean dumps huge amounts of pent up heat ...


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