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Apparent temperatures help delineate thermal stress, or how hazardous to human health that thermal condition actually is. Which is why high ambient temperatures are often accompanied with a "wet-bulb temperature" (aka misery index). This better defines how hazardous the high temperature is to humans. On the low end, wind chill temperature does the ...


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The question is how one would define a heat index, and one could do that in many different ways that would all make sense: The way the heat index is defined is for people sitting in the shade where they are not exposed to wind. That's a reasonable approach as it is not an uncommon situation for people to be in such situations. One could define the heat ...


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All weather agencies record ‘ambient temperature’— how warm the air is in the shade and sheltered from the wind. This is done by placing weather recording instruments in a Stevenson Screen. The height above ground that Stevenson Screens are placed is between 1.25 and 2 m (4 ft 1 in and 6 ft 7 in). By using this approach weather readings from around the world ...


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This is typical of the winter weather in the Netherlands (I live there) and Belgium as well. In a period with maximum temperatures below 0, whether it's going to be cold or very cold in the night depends mainly on two things: the presence of any clouds which preserve the 'heat' from the day, and the presence of wind (especially from the south) which ...


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By that principle, I would expect water from the troposphere to diffuse into the stratosphere, where water content is significantly lower than in the former. You are forgetting that water is not nearly as volatile as are the long-lived gases that comprise the bulk of the Earth's atmosphere. Water's triple point temperature is 0.01° C. The triple point ...


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