6 votes
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Shouldn't India Get an Uplift Too?

The simple answer is 'crustal thickness'. The two crustal plates of India and Eurasia are very different in character. The Indian plate is thin, the Eurasian plate is much thicker and more rigid. Both ...
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5 votes

Lake Manasarovar v.s. Lake Rakshastal: fresh-water v.s. salt-water

You pretty much answered the question yourself. Lake Rakshastal, along with most of the lakes along the Tibetan plateau is, indeed an endorheic lake. The important meaning of that term is that there ...
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3 votes

How Do Plateaus Really Form?

First of all, a plateau as an area of flat topography which stands at higher elevation than the surrounding region; it does not need to be at high elevation in absolute terms. Indeed, there are ...
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3 votes

What Happens When India Stops Hitting Asia

You are correct in that, sooner or later (and nobody can say just when) the Indian plate will stop crashing into the Eurasian plate, and the the two plates will effectively fuse into a single plate. ...
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2 votes

How do I explain why the Tibetan plateau is colder than lowlands at similar latitudes?

Temperature is a measure of kinetic energy which, in the atmosphere, is due to the number of molecules and their speed. There is less atmosphere at higher altitudes (e.g. lower pressure, less ...
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1 vote
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Why are thrust faults older than normal faults in the Himalayan-Tibetan plateau?

In line with what strawberry-sunshine has answered, and to put it into more layman terms, after a compressive episode there's a distensive one. Imagine you have a volume of sand, and you are ...
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