25

The Tibetan Plateau uplift is still generally considered as playing a role in the Neogene cooling through the process you explained in your question (see for instance the seminal Zachos et al. 2001 and more recently Garzione 2008). It is probable that other phenomena played a role as well such as the diversification of diatoms (which are, today, the most ...


16

The answer is because the Earth is not a static system. Due to the ideal gas law, air cools as it rises. This is referred to as the dry adiabatic lapse rate. However, you are curious why every location on earth is not the same temperature at the same latitude. We know this is not true. But why is not true? Weather. The earth, as with most natural ...


11

You are correct that solar input on the Tibetan plateau will be the same as a location at sea level at the same latitude. You are also correct that the Sun heats the Earths surface and that in turn heats the atmosphere. Now for the rest of the details. Albedo Albedo is a measure of "whiteness" and gives us an idea of how solar irradiance interacts with ...


11

Per yesterday's What-If, If you make a building too big, the top part is heavy and it squishes the bottom part. In the context of Tibet, what this means is that rock has a yield strength: pile it up high enough and it will break (via earthquakes); and if you make a big enough pile, especially of continental material, then the concentrations of radiogenic ...


6

The simple answer is 'crustal thickness'. The two crustal plates of India and Eurasia are very different in character. The Indian plate is thin, the Eurasian plate is much thicker and more rigid. Both plates are so buoyant with respect to the underlying mantle that neither can subduct in the normal sense. But India is moving so fast that something has to ...


5

You pretty much answered the question yourself. Lake Rakshastal, along with most of the lakes along the Tibetan plateau is, indeed an endorheic lake. The important meaning of that term is that there is no outflow from that basin. Water evaporates, but as with any evaporative process, the minerals in the water stay behind and become more concentrated. ...


3

First of all, a plateau as an area of flat topography which stands at higher elevation than the surrounding region; it does not need to be at high elevation in absolute terms. Indeed, there are plateaux below sea level. There are several different processes at the origin of the plateaux in the map you link. Some, such as the Deccan and the Columbia plateau,...


3

You are correct in that, sooner or later (and nobody can say just when) the Indian plate will stop crashing into the Eurasian plate, and the the two plates will effectively fuse into a single plate. The underlying mantle convection is likely to continue for a few million years, tending to displace the combined plate further northward, probably with a ...


2

Temperature is a measure of kinetic energy which, in the atmosphere, is due to the number of molecules and their speed. There is less atmosphere at higher altitudes (e.g. lower pressure, less molecules), so a measure of temperature will be lower there because less molecules are moving around. That is the fundamental/basic reason that temperature is lower at ...


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