56 votes
Accepted

Farthest point from the center of the Earth

It's Chimborazo, Ecuador, but only just, beating Huascarán, Peru, by less than 50 metres. Both are over 2 km 'higher' than Everest. I made a plot of some mountains — height above centre of the earth ...
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23 votes

Farthest point from the center of the Earth

Mount Chimborazo, which is 6,268 meters above sea level and within 1.5 degrees of the equator. More specifically, according to Dr. Milbert, Chief Geodesist, NOAA, National Geodetic Survey and Dr. ...
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  • 5,892
17 votes
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What are the non-anthropogenic causes of The Netherlands' low elevation?

Forming of coastline During the last ice age, the North Sea was dry. When the ice melted sea levels slowly started to rise again and due to tides and currents a barrier of dunes was formed along what ...
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  • 420
12 votes

Would it be geographically feasible to store water on land to counteract sea level rise?

Using the eTopo1 data Eakins and Sharman has calculated a hypsographic curve for the earth. In the elevation span between + 6 to -6 m they found that land area will change by 396 000 km2 per meter sea ...
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11 votes
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Is there a special name for along-course elevation profiles of rivers, and where you can you find them?

I guess there are multiple names, but I know it as the river's "long profile", and it is used in academic papers (one example here and a search in google scholar here). But you can find similar ...
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10 votes
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Details on Ocean floor

Those are bathymetric survey tracks. The survey artifacts are very straight and regular in character, compared to geological features. What you're seeing is an increased level of detail along the ...
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10 votes
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Determining the paleoelevation of mountain ranges

I'll begin with your second question, as to how mountains erode. To simplify things, there are two methods: Physical weathering, where the rocks are broken down by weather. For example, there are ...
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10 votes
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Does bathymetry affect ocean topography/height?

Oceanic topography of the sea surface $\zeta$ can be defined as the height of the sea surface relative to a particular level surface, the geoid. The geoid to be the level surface that coincided with ...
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8 votes
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What are the striations or ridges in the eastern Pacific Ocean?

They are fracture zones. I've annotated your image with the names of these very long, tectonically important features. They even have names, such as the Mendocino Fracture Zone: I also labelled some ...
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8 votes

Would it be geographically feasible to store water on land to counteract sea level rise?

The largest desalination plant is the sun - with its action on the oceans and turning sea water into fresh water (by evaporation->clouds->rain) it has more capacity than any man made structure to pump ...
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  • 1,374
8 votes
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What's the difference between topography and orography?

Topography, in the eyes of Earth Scientists, is the study of the surface features of the Earth (or other planet), and includes all features of that surface, natural or artificial. From the Oxford ...
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  • 216
8 votes
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Public sources of topographical data of Earth?

This is an interesting and common question, so I'll try to give a good answer here, that I think is a good place, as well as GIS and Open Data SE. First, regarding the format, you will never find data ...
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7 votes

If ALL the ice melted, what percentage of the Earth's surface would be water?

As @gerrit commented, a precise calculation would need to incorporate a litospheric model to account for isostatic post-glacial rebound. But the "blurry approximation" you want, can be obtained based ...
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7 votes
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Old topographic maps of Odisha, India

The PCL Map Collection (University of Texas at Austin) is a huge online collection of maps. For India, they have a series from the U.S. Army Map Service which might be of interest, as it dates from ...
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7 votes

What are these 'spine' land features on the banks of the Oder river?

River Groynes or Wing dams which help to maintain a navigable channel by increasing river scour along the channel for shipping, reducing the need for dredging. They may also help reduce ice jamming.
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5 votes

Would it be geographically feasible to store water on land to counteract sea level rise?

The best solution to this type of problem would be to desalinate all excess water at shorelines. This could be done with desalination plants that use their own energy produced from tidal/wave ...
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5 votes

Topographic Maps

Map elements and signatures Every signature used in the map (except of elevation contour lines) has to be explained in the legend. For example, the dashed line is not explained. Your map needs a ...
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  • 685
4 votes

Why does Google maps (in terrain mode) space thier topo lines 80 feet apart?

Based on USGS (Department of the Interior – United States Geological Survey) toopgraphic maps, where on a 7.5 min Quadrangle map, the contour interval is commonly 40 feet. Larger maps 15 min to 1'-2' ...
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3 votes

Calculation of river width in relation to contributing area

It's a function of flow volume rather than catchment area. The flow rate can be vary by an order of 10 to 100 for the same catchment area, https://www.google.com/search?q=average+river+width+based+on+...
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3 votes

What are the striations or ridges in the eastern Pacific Ocean?

Several data sources with very different resolutions are combined in such maps, for example gravity measurements from satellites and echo sounding (there is also a wikpedia article on that, I can only ...
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  • 476
3 votes

Would it be geographically feasible to store water on land to counteract sea level rise?

Pump the water somewhere it will freeze and remain so. Who's buying? My question would be if it's economically viable. If we can put man on the moon and send probes outside our solar system I see no ...
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  • 495
3 votes

Complete missing outcrop problem

First step - draw a strike line where line A intersects the 400 m line. Second step - you know that the sandstone layer is of equal thickness and dip, so you can draw a parallel line at the place with ...
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  • 22.2k
3 votes

What are the parallel horizontal lines on Google's satellite images?

The yellow east-west trending lines (except possibly one) are transcurrent faults associated with mid-ocean ridges. They divide strips of ocean floor produced by segments of the ridge. A mid-ocean ...
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  • 3,028
2 votes

Determining the paleoelevation of mountain ranges

Determining an uplift rate for rocks is not easy, but certain techniques will produce far more reliable results than others. There are also qualitative techniques that provide estimates so rough as to ...
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2 votes

Why is the elevation of the Iberian Peninsula so high?

I don't know for sure, but my guess is that at least a part of the high Iberian elevation is due to NNE-SSW compression in northeast Spain, caused by rotation of the Iberian block. That is,the same ...
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2 votes

Topographic Maps

Some hints to get you thinking. Remember contours are lines joining points of the same elevation. Let's say the island is in the ocean - what is the elevation of the shore-line around the island? If ...
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  • 4,309
2 votes

Why are the south, the west and the north of the Caspian sea lush but its east completely dry?

The mountains. The south has a steep relief, as well as the west. That means that there is much precipitation. The clouds throw every drop on these mountains, so almost nothing is left. The east is ...
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