19

First, it's good to note that it really wasn't much of Ida that went that far... in terms of the strength of the low pressure (and the resultant wind), while the swampy waters in southern Louisiana may've helped it maintain category 4 strength for an extra few hours inland, it decayed rapidly soon after, becoming a depression in Mississippi, and ...


7

You're asking about several different aspects so let me try and get them in order. The slow drop off in rainfall is in fact because of the Brown Ocean Effect just a bigger one than we've seen before. Once Ida made landfall it was crossed one hot, saturated watershed after another and fed on their heat and moisture to extend its range. Because of how ...


4

Cyclone tracks are influenced by the environmental wind. These can include subtropical ridges, mid latitude upper level troughs , other tropical cyclones (Fujiwara effect) and other transient highs and lows. Specifically in the Western North Pacific there are two synoptic scale phenomena that can influence cyclone tracks - Tropical Upper Tropospheric Trough ...


3

It really depends on how you define storms. For tropical storms, there are some regions where they are not usually a threat. Likewise, for extratropical storms, there are latitudes where such things are not a concern (such as the tropics). The key to understanding the seasonality to such storms is to understand what controls the seasonality of what drives ...


3

My first observation upon looking at the picture was that Typhoon In-fa (the southernmost one in the picture) nearly stalled prior to making the right angled turns in its path. There is a clustering of very closely spaced location markers for the dates 19 and 20 July, prior to the first 90 degree turn and then again for the dates 22 to 24 July at the time of ...


2

The storm and basics: Here is an animation I got from this NOAA Tweet of the lightning in Harvey hours before landfall: https://mashable.com/2017/08/31/harvey-weather-satellite-maps-lightning/, where I found the imagery, offers some basic thoughts, including the key concept that: As with most hurricanes, you'll notice that the most active area of lightning ...


1

A hurricane is a system dynamic of moisture and warm air. As they go north, they get colder, and when they run out of energy, the moisture condenses in cooler climate. Precipitation is inevitable. An average thunderstorm cloud contains enough water drops to fill up approximately 275 million gallons, and a hurricane can store several billion.


1

Yes, In he tropics where humidity is more ubiquitous moist air currents feed systems that allow for storms. In temperate climates these storms proliferate where it's warm and humid and die off in winter.


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