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1

To begin with, the formation of the Himalayas was never volcanic which is why you don't find volcanic rocks in the Himalayas. As for the subducting Indian oceanic plate (which contained Indian continental crust) that volcanism can be found in Tibet and the eastern Himalayas, in far northern Myanmar. This would suggest an oblique component to the subduction ...


4

We don't know for sure because A. the evidence has almost all been erased by the continued crustal shortening of the area where the volcanic arc(s) would have been. B. the region is huge and volcanism will have varied in duration greatly across the range as a whole. The "core range" of the Himalaya has lost on the order of 6000km (~2500 miles) of ...


4

In terms of rheology, there is a key difference between water and lava: water is a Newtonian fluid, lava isn't. In early volcanology days, there has been attempts to model lava as a Newtonian fluid (Nichols, 1939). This approach may be a good approximation in some cases (very fluid lavas, like pāhoehoe flows), but does not work for more viscous lavas ('a'ā ...


9

The similarities pretty much end at the fact that both water and lava flow downhill seeking the lowest possible level. As even the most fluid lavas flow somewhat slower than water because of their higher density and viscosity, their lower speed and in particular their viscosity makes them far less erosive of the terrain they flow over/through. In fact lava ...


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