A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

New answers tagged

2

Molten rock must be a liquid, mobile rock is any rock capable of moving, sand and mud can be mobile.


3

Where one part of a plate continues almost horizontally while an adjacent section is driven down into the mantle, wouldn't that cause a violent fracture of the plate, and if not, why not? In case of the Nazca plate probably not because that is still warm and partly ductile (see the linked work in the other thread). Also, these cracks and deformations ...


2

This very much looks like a lava tumulus to me. Tumuli are a very common feature in pahoehoe lava flow fields. There is a classic paper by Walker (1991) describing their morphological characteristics and formation process. They are formed by inflation of the cold, stationary crust which is lifted upwards by the influx of new lava underneath. From what I see ...


4

I think we can confidently enough answer "no". From this report (p. 23): Kilauea eruptions occur either at its summit or within two well-defined swaths (called rift zones) that radiate from the summit. In the same report, you can see those rift zones on the map page 3, or on the sketch of the plumbing system page 24. Most lava flows are emplaced along ...


1

And it is similarly just a naming convention with the meteor* things: https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/asteroid-or-meteor/en/ and https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/asteroids-comets-and-meteors/meteors-and-meteorites/in-depth/ Regardless of its composition, when it breaks off from an asteroid or comet, as long as it is in space it is a meteoroid. When it hits the ...


2

For magma and lava it's liked you said: "magma" is used under the surface, "lava" above. See for instance the definition of USGS Volcano Hazard Program's glossary: Lava: General term for magma (molten rock) that has been erupted onto the surface of the Earth and maintains its integrity as a fluid or viscous mass, rather than exploding into fragments. Now,...


3

There are lot of studies on the past activity of Mount Vesuvius. Eruptive deposits have been studied and dated in order to reconstruct the type and timing of past eruptions. This can give some indication of what to expect even if, and I cannot stress this enough, past activity patterns of a given volcano does not predict its future activity. It can give a ...


13

As you said, the Andean belt is divided into four segments, usually called the northern, central, southern, and austral volcanic zones (NVZ, CVZ, SVZ and AVZ, respectively; your map lacks the AVZ). This has been interpreted as a difference in the angle of subduction. Under the active zones, the subducting plate (called "slab") sinks into the mantle, ...


5

So, this is the setting. A relatively young plate plate is subducted under the south American continent. The subducting oceanic plate contains water that is squeezed out under pressure and starts to rise. Water (fluids) generally lower the melting point, so hot asthenosphere above the colder subducting plate partially melts, the magma, being more mobile, ...


-1

When an oceanic plate is subducted below a continental plate, it dives into the mantle, taking water with it and producing frictional heat which melts some of the rock (rock with a high water content melts more easily). This produces plumes of magma beneath the continental plate margins. As the magma is lighter than the mantle material, it rises until it ...


1

Very unlikely, especially as the major industrial nations will come nowhere near to meeting their greenhouse gases emission targets. Major volcanic eruptions, like major earthquakes, are random and unpredictable. The last really big volcanic eruption we had was Tambora, on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa in 1815. That caused climate cooling for a few years, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included