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1

No, the rate of flow would usually be unaffected. The same volume of water has to get to the sea, so unless the ice was so thick and so well anchored to the riverbank as to exert pressure on the flow of water beneath, which is very unlikely, the rate of flow would remain the same. If, in the unlikely event that the ice exerted pressure on the water, the rate ...


-5

Yes, it could reduce sea level rise, but it would be no good for irrigation. Many deserts, like the Aral Sea and Death Valley, are below sea level. This means you would not need to use energy to pump the water, but could use the siphon principle. Some people say that even if you filled all these low-lying deserts with sea water, it would not do much to lower ...


2

This is no an answer per se, just a back-of-the-envelope calculation for fun. Lifting 1 kg (one litre) of water up a height of 1 meter uses 9.8 (let's say 10) joules of energy. Let's say you want to lower the sea level by 1 meter. You need to pump 3.6e17 litres (3.6e14 m2 of ocean area = 3.6e14 m3 to pump * 1000 for litre conversion). Let's say you want ...


0

Yes, you can increase evaporation by spraying the sea water as an aerosol because this increases surface area. It's the same with fresh water too, but why would you want to do it? It wouldn't have any noticeable effect on the humidity of the general area. The only useful effect that I can see concerns fresh water only. Spraying the water from a pond or small ...


0

The water in your pond has to lower to below freezing. It takes time for the heat of the water to transfer to the surroundings. The ground underneath the water probably isn't below freezing either, so it will be transferring heat to the water at the same time. Looking at the temperature history for the time in question, the high temperatures for all the ...


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