New answers tagged

3

There are two reasons for this surprising finding: Compaction. Once you have high pressures at depth, the less dense material goes up. Take a bucket of water, put sand in it, and squeeze the sand really hard. Water goes up. Then, you'd expect no water at depth of several kilometres. Even if you somehow had free water at these depths, the expectation is that ...


2

Nothing really prevents water from existing deep inside Earth. We have direct evidence that it does, even in the mantle. Evidence for such water may be found in Ice VII inclusions in diamonds[1]. Because of their great mechanical strength, diamonds formed in the mantle retain GPa-level pressure within their lattice, so when they come to the surface and ...


Top 50 recent answers are included