Ash
  • Member for 4 years, 5 months
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  • New Zealand
Why is the Arctic melting, but the Antarctic doing great?
67 votes

Not quite. The report actually shows an increase in extent, but not the volume, of sea-ice around Antarctica. That sounds good, but the data appendix in the report shows the Antarctic continental ice-...

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If the Bennu asteroid were to hit within a 500 mile radius of Yellowstone National Park, will it trigger a super volcano at Yellowstone?
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17 votes

Maybe but it will depend on the state of the magma chamber under the caldera. If the magma chamber is already under enough pressure and has a super-eruptive quantity of liquid melt in it then the ...

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Why are the latest additions to the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain the highest?
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14 votes

As it was explained to me at university there are two factors; buoyancy and erosion. Rock buoyancy is a major factor, fresh Basalt is hot and dry and has a much lower density than older oceanic ...

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Why does this shoreline change this way?
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12 votes

Short version; the beach moves because the waves change. Long version; Beaches, and in fact entire bays, conform in shape and alignment to the prevailing wave patterns in the area. The exact magnitude ...

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Would the shaking of an earthquake be visible to somebody in a low-flying aircraft?
11 votes

It depends largely on how deep, or shallow, the earthquake is, how large, and what kind of terrain you're looking down on. Some fairly large earthquakes, magnitude 6-7, can have very little surface ...

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Similarities and differences between lava flows and fluvial geomorphology (rivers)
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9 votes

The similarities pretty much end at the fact that both water and lava flow downhill seeking the lowest possible level. As even the most fluid lavas flow somewhat slower than water because of their ...

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Does the amount of UVA radiations one receives depend on the day ot the year?
8 votes

UVA passes through the atmosphere without losing much intensity, so per quote one it's intensity doesn't change, nor does it's magnitude as a percentage of total insolation vary, much, during the year ...

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Why does the salt in the oceans not sink to the bottom?
8 votes

Turbulence, because seawater is, almost, always on the move saltier water is mixed with fresher by wave action and, to a lesser extent in surface waters, by Brownian motion. In Fjordland the annual ...

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Why did Hurricane Ida have so much precipitation when it reached the Northeast?
7 votes

You're asking about several different aspects so let me try and get them in order. The slow drop off in rainfall is in fact because of the Brown Ocean Effect just a bigger one than we've seen before. ...

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If a specific mass of air is polluted, will the pollution stick with it?
7 votes

Air is a fluid, as such it tends to mix and concentrations, of anything, tend to disperse into the wider volume. Erik's cup of tea metaphor is pretty accurate, currents of air will pull apart your ...

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How would Earth map look like if all ice melts?
7 votes

Calculated Earth is one of the better tools for this, you can either zoom in and get various flood stages or set a specific flood stage and see what would flood, it is in metric though so you may need ...

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Photo of sprites in a clear dark sky, how is this possible?
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6 votes

According to this Wikipedia entry Sprites occur at altitudes between 50 and 90km while the thunderstorms that create them generally top out below 16km so there is a minimum of more than 30km of height ...

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What causes these mound-like ground formations?
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6 votes

They're landslide deposits; Mam Tor gets its name, which translates as "mother hill", from the regular landslides that come off the higher slopes and form hillocks further down into the valley.

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Is a glacier advancing or retreating? How to tell?
6 votes

The only signs I know of to identify glacial retreat on first meeting is the presence or absence of "dead ice", the presence of "push" on moraines, and the state of any terminal lake. Dead-ice is a ...

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Are wetlands a net source or net sink of GHGs?
5 votes

Depends on a number of factors. The main issue is the balance of carbon sequestration in peat versus methane emission if they're trapping more carbon dioxide through growth than their equivalent ...

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When did the proto-Himalayas become non-volcanic?
5 votes

We don't know for sure because A. the evidence has almost all been erased by the continued crustal shortening of the area where the volcanic arc(s) would have been. B. the region is huge and volcanism ...

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Does global warming inhibit transport of moisture?
5 votes

Increased air temperature tends to increase the rate of moisture transfer, firstly because at a given relative humidity and pressure warmer air has a higher absolute humidity and is carrying more ...

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Why were Fe-oxides not usually used for finding skarn Fe ore deposits in geochemical exploration?
5 votes

Skarn is metamorphosed sedimentary rock, it's iron deposits are in the form of sulfides. This means two things; There almost certainly will be iron oxide contamination throughout the unit, at least I ...

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Are there any rock recognition practices or games?
5 votes

You could look at this and similar apps but they're more from the other side, you have a rock here's what you need to ask yourself to ID it. I don't use anything like that myself because I memorised ...

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What is this Lake Michigan rock?
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5 votes

I can't be definite but my three best guesses are Travertine, Agate and maybe Halite, if it fizzes in mild acid it's Travertine, a form of Limestone, if it dissolves in hot water it's Halite, or ...

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If the Earth were a smooth spheroid, how deep would the ocean be?
5 votes

510,100,000 square kilometers of surface area, and a total of 1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers of water gives you a 2.717 kilometer column of water across the whole planet if it was billiard ball smooth,...

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How older is this snail shell possible could be?
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4 votes

That's not a snail per se it's the shell of an ammonite which is more like a squid with an external shell than anything else I can think to compare it to. They went extinct with the dinosaurs so it's ...

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Is salt accumulating over time?
4 votes

There is a limit to how much of a given salt can be dissolved into water, this is known as it's solubility and it's dynamic based upon how much of any particular ion is already present. Once ...

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What can one come to know about a mineral just by knowing name
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4 votes

It depends, most of the mineral names we use are derived from old Greek names that were basically comments on the appearance or behaviour of the materials so Galena means literally Lead Ore, which it ...

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Temperature differences in sand
4 votes

Yes sand is, on average, quite insulative with the temperature at the surface being rather higher than that at depth when the surface is being actively heated, as by sunlight. The actual degree of ...

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Are there lava flows inside a volcano?
4 votes

This is largely an issue of trying to show three dimensional structures in a two dimensional medium. It is also an issue of trying to differentiate between different materials and volcanic behaviours. ...

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ID on a potential flint fossil
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4 votes

Assuming that the identification of the rock as Flint/Chert and not Limestone/Dolomite is correct I'd say it's a formation artifact rather than a fossil. What I mean is that at some point as it was ...

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Why are there no volcanoes where continents collide with each other?
3 votes

Two major reasons, crustal thickening and thermochemical interactions. Heat plumes, whether from crustal recycling or the deep mantle, can only melt through so much rock before they lose heat and ...

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What is the role of trace elements in magmatic crystallization?
3 votes

Not much of anything, trace elements are found in low concentrations in the mantle because they are lithophobic. During crystallisation they end up in the residue of silica, and incompatible elements ...

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How do long, thin, island chains such as North Carolina's outer banks, form?
3 votes

The outer banks are, literally, a textbook example of what are known as Barrier Islands. They are thought to be formed through interactions between sediment undergoing longshore drift, coastal ...

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