Jun
6
comment How to easily remember orientation of latitude and longitude?
This is interesting because it's one step away from the memory aid I came up with when I was much younger, latitude = flatitude Repeating the rhyme dozens of times along with picturing that concept set it in my head well enough to remember permanently (and if I'm being honest, still pops up in my head after dealing with lat/lon values every day for almost two decades)
May
16
revised Are these plane trails seen from satellite
added 18 characters in body
May
15
comment Are these plane trails seen from satellite
@uhoh Makes sense, added as a reference to the mention of contrail formations - thanks!
May
15
revised Are these plane trails seen from satellite
Added additional citation to discussion of contrail formation
May
14
answered Are these plane trails seen from satellite
May
9
comment What produces these amazing 3D structures in Tibet?
Thanks - I expanded my answer, still including that edit, to add some additional proof including a reference directly about the exact location in question.
May
9
revised What produces these amazing 3D structures in Tibet?
Expanded the answer to add more references including one specific to the location in question
May
9
answered What produces these amazing 3D structures in Tibet?
May
4
comment Can airplanes trigger rain?
This would be an interesting question that I don't think is directly answered by other questions on the site, if it were refocused to ask about the effects of contrails - i.e., the legitimate phenomenon that's related to aircraft engines, rather than the idea of "chemtrails" which open up a whole world of conspiracy nonsense (see earthscience.stackexchange.com/questions/3009/…)
Apr
26
comment Ordered arrangement of clouds
Agreed, this is answered in the linked question, this photo is just a bit closer in compared to the example in the link.
Mar
27
comment Did temperature for the US state of Illinois reach an all-time record low 1/31/2019?
This has been pretty fascinating to watch, and provides a good case study into how temperature measurements are made and verified - particularly in the modern era, where we have instant access to any number of weather observations both official and unofficial.
Mar
16
revised How do I interpret this “sky cover” chart?
Added a reference to a source mentioned in the comments and some mentions of the type of sky cover observation
Mar
16
comment How do I interpret this “sky cover” chart?
Thanks @MikeChristianson and Barry Carter, I spent a while searching specifically for NDFD definitions and was somehow never able to find that. The observer vs. instrument question is valid, but I initially felt that would be getting too far into the details for a question focused on simple forecast interpretation. I'll add in a citation and a mention of that, though.
Mar
15
comment How do I interpret this “sky cover” chart?
Thanks, a good clarification as both refer to the same quantity but exact terminology is variable depending on the source or forecast. Added that and a reference to the definition at the top of the wikipedia article - interestingly, the AMS glossary is my starting point for questions like this but the latest edition omits the mention of any viewing location - still clearly referring to the same thing, though.
Mar
15
revised How do I interpret this “sky cover” chart?
Added a note on slightly differing terminology and an additional citation suggested in comments
Mar
15
answered How do I interpret this “sky cover” chart?
Mar
14
comment How to tell if fog is made out of water droplets or ice crystals?
@Muze That's pretty neat, I've never heard of that, I hadn't realized the light source would be powerful enough to show anything. That would be useful in this context.
Mar
4
comment What is the smallest and largest cloud?
This is tough, I'm not aware of defined limits on either end. As "clouds" are just defined by volumes of liquid water or ice particles there's no lower limit other than what's practical to see (as alluded to in a few comments). Distinct types of clouds may be classified based on observed characteristics but these all exist in a spectrum, ie they don't lose their "cloud" definition if a classification is not identifiable. Even beyond this, continuous clouds can exist in a storm system over thousands of square miles, how would these be quantified? This seems too ambiguous to have a good answer.
Mar
1
awarded  Fanatic
Feb
23
comment Rainbow dynamics?
@KeithMcClary Thanks! Added that in as an example.