Rokman
  • Member for 2 years, 5 months
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
  • Calgary, AB, Canada
1 answers
1 votes
111 views
Is there a name for subduction boundaries at the North of Australia?
Accepted answer
1 votes

I do not think there is one name for the area. Rather it is a region with multiple plates, namely the Timor Plate, the eastern portion of the Banda Sea Plate, the Maoke Plate and the Woodlark Plate, ...

View answer
3 answers
9 votes
560 views
Is there a widely accepted reason for the formation of tafoni?
0 votes

It is called preferential weathering, but there is another element at play. Before the rock eroded into circular features, there were softer materials present. Those softer materials weathered away ...

View answer
2 answers
17 votes
2k views
What temperature do small meteorites have on impact
1 votes

When meteorites are found, they are cold, much like it is in deep space. The meteor body may be warm to the touch (has been reported, whether or not it is true is another thing) but it is important to ...

View answer
1 answers
7 votes
138 views
Does a registry for fallen meteors exist?
2 votes

The short answer is "yes" and the links are provided below. Fireball reports: https://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/fireball-report/ Classified meteorites: https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/

View answer
1 answers
3 votes
105 views
Ordered arrangement of clouds
2 votes

These are weakly formed gravity clouds or density clouds. Clouds are formed from condensation, which is just tiny water (and other gases) droplets and vapor. As such, these tiny droplets and vapors ...

View answer
2 answers
4 votes
112 views
Climate consequences of very large asteroids striking the Deep Ocean
0 votes

I submit the argument that it wouldn't have much an effect on the scale you're inquiring. A 5km wide impactor (like the Manicouagan was calculated to be) in the massive ocean, wouldn't do much damage. ...

View answer
2 answers
3 votes
68 views
How older is this snail shell possible could be?
1 votes

Looks like the Xenodiscaceae (an ammonite family, as the top comment already mentioned.) Based on the region where you found it, my research suggests it is very old, from a time known as the Permian (...

View answer