LifeInTheTrees
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Where are the oldest igneous rocks found?
6 votes

Zircons from Australia at 4.4Ga, and perhaps basalts from a Canadian island at 4.5Ga. It would interest you to know the quest of Boston University geochemist Matthew Jackson, who is searching for the ...

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Wouldn't 'fertilizing' the ocean to increase cyanobacteria, algae and other phytoplankton populations actually INCREASE CO2 levels in the air?
5 votes

The arrival of plants can only reduce the total CO2 levels because they metabolize carbon and oxygen. Plants don't make CO2 appear which wasn't there, they only absorb and release ambient CO2. Two ...

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What kind of lava tube feature is Cleopatra's Grave?
Accepted answer
5 votes

It's just average ropy lava called pahoehoe by geologists. It's similar to dough so it easily forms ropes like the ones around the side and bulbs like the central area which is similar to a pillow ...

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What type of mammal does this fossil tooth belong to?
Accepted answer
5 votes

It's an entelodont, South Dakota is famous for it's Oligocene mammalian faunas which include entelodonts such as Archaeotherium and Daeodon. here is an http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/181202162847-0-1/...

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How much wind power is there roughly in Britain and its surrounding?
4 votes

2.2TWe on average in the seas... The uk uses less than 350 Gigawatts every year, so the sea can provide about 6 times the current UK energy consumption: 80 GW in shallow waters (0-25 m) 270 GW in seas ...

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What is this geomorphological form?
4 votes

There is a similar and bigger chalk plateau at "plateau d'urle" in France. That one looks like a "chalk plateau of continental shelf origin with straight channels eroded into the underlying clays", ...

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Is it possible to form a diamond-sapphire hybrid?
4 votes

Sapphires and ruby's are both aluminium oxide. sapphire melts at 2000 degrees and diamond synthesis can happen at 600 degrees. To coat around the sapphire, you would have to use multiple diamond seeds,...

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Simple way to understand these narrow frequency peaks in recently published "ice shelf singing"?
Accepted answer
4 votes

The wavelengths that travel through the ice have a faster speed of travel, and the physical size of the pressure variations that cause the sound are not 100 meters. It's more like 1 meter, so it's ...

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Calculation of river width in relation to contributing area
3 votes

It's a function of flow volume rather than catchment area. The flow rate can be vary by an order of 10 to 100 for the same catchment area, https://www.google.com/search?q=average+river+width+based+on+...

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How much net carbon can coral sequester?
3 votes

Corals usually grow 1cm every year, some as slow as 2mm, some faster. Coral sand density is about 1.5g /cm2, it's not the best estimate of coral weight. So, a coral organism of 10cm^2 produces 150 ...

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Where did the sand in the Sahara come from?
3 votes

Only 25% of the Sahara is sand and dunes. 70% of the Sahara is bare rock and stones. Un-watermarked version avaliable on www.alamy.com Silicon makes up 27 percent of rocks on average. The Sahara is ...

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In cities, is the pollution level higher on higher floors?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Yes, the higher floors will have less pollution than the street level. The wind rises as a function of altitude, so the street will have less new air coming in, on average: Some of the pollutants are ...

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How do we know the Arctic is just ice?
2 votes

You can study the many maps, it seems there is a giant ridge foming but the ice grinds it faster than it rises. Icebergs are grinding the arctic deeper than sea level, like 300/400 meters deep, also ...

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What is the time period of these chalk/clay layers?
2 votes

The layers correspond to thousands of years, i.e. 23,000 years in the Danien timeline: The page sais that there is a variation of 23,000 for precession of the equinoxes and 100,000 for variation of ...

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Would climate change result in an increase in seismic activities?
2 votes

Water can perhaps change the timing of second order seismic activity, although it's not expected to change the amplitude. Activities like fracking and putting water into stress faults have a greater ...

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When metamorphic rocks undergo pressure, how are they changed?
2 votes

Metamorphic can have been halfway to the state of lava for a short time, it may have been like quite tough dough of bread. You can imagine the viscosity of it to be the same as ordinary glass which is ...

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Question Concerning Meteorite Ejecta Travel
1 votes

The research doesn't provide enough information to specify the displacement process of a 0.1mm spherule over 12,000 kilometers from North Greenland to Chile. If the suggested impact was from Greenland,...

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Will increased level of ocean acidity lead to more frequent acid rain?
1 votes

Essentially no. Acid rain was especially a problem when coal and other industries let up vast amout of sulphur which made strong sulphuric acid rain which could kill trees. Volcanos can also have ...

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Is weathering of rock a primary means of $\text{CO}_2$ scrubbing on primordial Earth?
1 votes

NO, it's not a very major sink on our planet, red is the extra carbon from human activities: https://jancovici.com/en/climate-change/ghg-and-carbon-cycle/wont-the-carbon-sinks-absorb-the-extra-co2/ ...

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Why autumn follows the rainy season
Accepted answer
1 votes

The precise reasons for leaf shedding after monsoon aren't well known and studied, but there are vague reasons like optimising use of light and warmth for max photosynthetic gain. So the tree has a ...

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Using Enhanced Rock Weathering in the Sahel Region of Africa
1 votes

Note that the sahel is a lost cause for the rainfall/CO2 absorption side of the equation. Heat tends to mineralize soil and reduce its organic content, so the sahel may be too hot. For fertiliser, ...

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How does the act of producing animal feed from the leftovers of a process result in a negative carbon footprint?
1 votes

Its only marketing, not a science equation... It's saying that their gin gives back CO$_2$ from other gin which uses fertiliser, and saves a bit of crop space for livestock food. Overall, any crops ...

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How long ago was the first limestone formed?
1 votes

Perhaps some of the oldest limestones are the banded Espanola Formation from 2.3 billion years ago. The Oxygenation of the environment happened 2.4 billion years ago. I'll find some references and ...

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How long could a steel artifact last?
0 votes

The best chance if the oxydation process leaves a hollow shell which can become a mold for another mineral. The trouble is that ferrous oxide cakes up so the boundary of the original object is ...

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It is possible to send a probe deep within the Earth?
0 votes

For power, it would need about 50 times the power output of a space satellite. You'd need >1000w to drill a football sized object through bread-dough consistency rock faster than the flow rate. It ...

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How exactly is the "global average temperature" calculated and how reasonable is this method?
0 votes

It's the same as if you had to average the temperature of your kitchen comprising a hot oven on one side and a cold window on another, you'd have to divide the kitchen into a grid and get a laser ...

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Will the Earth ever stop rotating?
0 votes

No not really, because the earth will be engulfed by the sun as a red giant at which point it might accrete mass or fall into the sun, still rotating at 50hrs/day... we d be talking well above 20/50 ...

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Book recommendation for 7 year old
0 votes

I'd splash out and buy 50 A4 sized books on science and nature and history: Astronomy, Stars, Human body, Insects, Rocks, Gemstones, inventions, all for 6-12 year olds, with big pretty pictures and ...

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Do winds behave like waves?
0 votes

I wish to provide a counterbalance argument. it's just not wavy, it's a chaos of pressure-fronts, wind is doughnuts, and waves have equilibrium points and transmission media. vs Scientific ...

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Why do rivers have 'wells' in mountains?
0 votes

If you look at a catchment basin, it is nearly always bordered by mountains. it's because water flows downhill. Altitude is water's motor system. All the peripheries of the river system are on high ...

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