Gimelist
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Does this peer-reviewed study (referenced in Forbes) contradict the accepted position that climate change is real?
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40 votes

I want to know if that article has been refuted anywhere Yes. You can read all about it in the blog post James Taylor misinterprets study by 180 degrees. In short, the original paper was designed ...

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Why is Earth's age given by dating meteorites rather than its own rocks?
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38 votes

Some background: We are able to determine the age of certain rocks and minerals using measurements of radioactive and radiogenic isotopes of certain elements. The most common are U-Th-Pb, Rb-Sr and ...

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How do we know the asteroids formed at the same time as earth?
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36 votes

what evidence do we have that the asteroids indeed formed at the same time as earth? It depends on what is your definition as "the same time". The formation of the solar system and Earth did not ...

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Why are cobalt deposits so unevenly distributed?
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30 votes

Part 1 The Democratic Republic of the Congo's Katanga Province contains almost 40% of the world's reserves of cobalt [1]. Why are deposits concentrated so strongly in such a small portion of the ...

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Why does the salt in the oceans not sink to the bottom?
29 votes

Why does the salt in the oceans not sink to the bottom? Because there isn't any "salt", per se, in the ocean. Salt, as the compound sodium chloride (NaCl) does not exist as a solid in the ocean. It ...

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Why doesn't the sun reach its highest point overhead at exactly 12:00 noon?
29 votes

Maybe a map will help visualise this a bit further: Source: "Solar time vs standard time" by Stefano Maggiolo - How much is time wrong around the world? As you can see, time zones are according to ...

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Why aren't seismic stations installed very deep underground so as to pre-warn from earthquakes?
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28 votes

The simple answer is that you can't drill to 50 km depth. The deepest holes ever drilled were to a little more than 12 km, one is named the Kola Superdeep Borehole in Russia, which was a scientific ...

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How much of a mountain is below the surface?
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23 votes

Is there some kind of math rule for how much does a mountain extends (depth) below the surface? Definitely! It is called isostasy. When I was a student, the lecture about isostasy started with a ...

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Can living where (rare) earth magnetic ore is abundant provide any protection from cosmic radiation?
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22 votes

Absolutely not. First of all, "rare earth magnet ore", meaning the ores of metals like neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm), is not magnetic at all. It only becomes a magnet once you make a ...

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What was the first rock in the rock cycle?
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22 votes

which came first That's actually a very hard question. The most simple answer would indeed be igneous. Here's why: Sedimentary rocks (in the sense of rock cycle) comes from pre-existing igneous or ...

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Are we experiencing lower level of gravity now compared to past?
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19 votes

Earth's radius is about 6400 kilometres. That's 6400000 metres. Let's say that you have a mound 20 metres high, burying an older settlement. Your new "radius" is now 6400020 metres. Let's say that $g ...

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Is it possible that the geomagnetic field reversal led to the extinction of Dinosaurs?
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19 votes

Mark's answer is correct, but in my opinion is not clear enough. Let's make it a bit simpler: Is it possible that the geomagnetic field reversal led to the extinction of Dinosaurs? NO, DEFINITELY ...

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How do geologists find ore deposits?
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19 votes

That is the multimillion dollar question! "looking for surface formations" is indeed one way, and it was the main method of exploration in the past. This does not necessarily mean that you directly ...

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Why does phosphate rock contain uranium?
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19 votes

To understand why sedimentary phosphate rocks (hereafter referred to as phosphorites) have elevated uranium contents we first need to understand what are they made of and why do they form in the first ...

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Why would India have so much thorium on its beaches?
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18 votes

why would India have so much thorium on it's beaches...? Because monazite. Monazite is a rare earth element phosphate, with the formula CePO4 (where Ce stands not only for cerium, but all of the are ...

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Why do felsic materials have lower melting points than mafic?
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18 votes

I'd like to add to Brian's answer, and also point out some inaccuracies. First of all, it is not true that felsic minerals have lower melting temperatures than mafic minerals. Here are some melting ...

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Why do gold deposits form only in certain areas of the earth?
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18 votes

I'll take the form of the question given by another person here and attempt to provide a different answer. So what you are asking is: "How did gold become so concentrated in certain parts of the ...

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Are metals and other elements in every continent?
16 votes

All stable elements (and the radioactive U and Th) exist everywhere on Earth. They're in the sand underneath your feet, they're in your bones, they're in the dust in the air, they're in the ocean. The ...

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What is the most important source of natural gas? Coal, oil or other?
16 votes

The most important source of natural gas is natural gas. This is why it is called natural. It is not "made" from oil or coal. Natural gas forms by decomposition of organic material. Whether the ...

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Effects of CERN on earth's magnetic field?
14 votes

CERN is a scientific site developed to create anti matter The scientific activity at CERN involves many things, anti matter being just one of them. For more information you can read their anti matter ...

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Why do human populations concentrate near fault lines, volcanoes, etc.?
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14 votes

You're asking Why do human populations concentrate near fault lines, volcanoes, etc.? But the real question is Do human populations concentrate near fault lines, volcanoes, etc.? And the ...

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Could a massive flood have formed the Grand Canyon?
14 votes

tl;dr: no. Long answer: First of all, like mentioned by others in the comments, you would need some physical mechanism to take a whole lot of water, evaporate it, and drop it at once at a place ...

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Is it possible for Earth to experience Polar Shift?
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14 votes

Is it possible for Earth to experience Polar Shift? Yes, and it has happened before. In the past 80 million years it happened over 150 times. The last time this happened was around 800 thousand ...

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Can a cosmic impact break Earth's crust in large area exposing the magma ocean?
14 votes

Let me first correct a small misconception. Where you are talking about 'the magma ocean', you are implying that one exists. This is in fact false. There is no 'magma ocean' in the Earth at the moment ...

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If people aim to reach the mantle, why don't they just use volcano craters?
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13 votes

why don't they just use volcano craters? Because volcano craters don't go to the mantle. Here's a sketch of how the crust, mantle, and volcanoes look like: Tan colour is crust, orange is mantle. ...

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Rocks sparking under water
13 votes

Is this possible? Definitely. I know you can get sparks from some rocks and minerals - but granite boulders [?] Yep. Quartz is one of those minerals that "sparks". It is piezoelectric, and ...

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Is it possible that the recent droughts are signs of epic crust failure?
13 votes

Is it possible that the recent droughts are signs of epic crust failure? No. Even though your 5 points do not make much sense, I'll try to answer it anyway. There are no continental plates. There ...

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Could one say that granites are metamorphic rocks, or not at all?
12 votes

This is the key: used to be part It is important to look at this in a historical context. Up until the 1950s and early 1960s, there was no agreement to how granites form. This became the granite ...

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Is there such a thing as a "basalt dike"?
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12 votes

"Basalt" per definition is a fine grained rock (that is, you can't see the individual crystals with the naked eye, aka aphanitic) with a certain chemical composition. The coarse grained form of this ...

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Why are there no volcanoes where continents collide with each other?
11 votes

Or is the continental crust too dry? Exactly this. Continental collision zones are actually full of volcanic rocks, which formed at the time before it was a continental collision zone. The Wikipedia ...

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