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We all know that the water on Earth came from asteroids that collided on the Earth. But how does water form in the asteroids?

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closed as off-topic by arkaia, gerrit Mar 21 '17 at 17:47

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If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ The sentence "We all know that the water on Earth came from asteroids" seems a bit strong. As far as I know the origin of water on Earth is still being debated: astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/8206/…. As can be seen in the answer to astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/10277/… there are still differences in the deuterium content between Earth and the asteroids. $\endgroup$ – arkaia Mar 21 '17 at 17:24
  • $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs in astronomy.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$ – arkaia Mar 21 '17 at 17:29
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    $\begingroup$ Please do not multi-post, you already asked this question on astronomy. $\endgroup$ – gerrit Mar 21 '17 at 17:42
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because you already asked it on astronomy SE, a community better suited to answer this question because the answer is essentially from the stars (although planetary science is on-topic here). $\endgroup$ – gerrit Mar 21 '17 at 17:47
  • $\begingroup$ While already answered, the answer is also basically explained here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frost_line_(astrophysics) $\endgroup$ – userLTK Mar 22 '17 at 5:34
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hydrogen is the most common element in the universe, Oxygen is the third most common element in the universe, hydrogen + oxygen + heat/energy = water. Water is literally the most common compound in the universe.

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