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6

Summarizing the comments I made above in this question and in this one - Does this weather pattern have a name ? I believe significant parts of the US are experiencing a Stationary Front for the past one month. There has been plenty of media coverage of this event and if you google the term "stationary front" under news one will receive a lot of links to ...


6

Carbonaceous aerosols are formed by a mixture of substances with different chemical, physical, and optical properties. Certain organic substances are mostly transparent to sunlight and therefore do not contribute to Earth warming or cooling. Other substances are mostly reflective, therefore their presence in the atmosphere contributes to Earth's cooling. ...


5

Yes, you can interpolate the rainfall from stations outside the watershed. However, the quality of the interpolation will depend on the distance between the stations and the watershed, the prevailing weather patterns, and to some extent the topography. For example, it probably wouldn't be appropriate to use a station on the rainy side of a mountain divide ...


3

In short: Yes you can/should use stations outside of your watershed. More in detail: There is well known methods in hydrology to solve the situation you are presenting. One simple method is to build Thiessen Polygons on your map to model the incoming precipitation in your target watershed using gauge station located inside and outside your watershed. The ...


2

In the field, in which I work, the term _ambient aerosol` is related to the water content of aerosol particles. Commonly in the atmosphere, water is attached to particles. The amount of water attached to particles depends on the relative humidity (in ambient air). Increasing relative humidity means more water and, hence, larger particle/droplet diameter. ...


2

Yes. The types of clouds formed are dependent on the profile of temperature and the profile of water vapor. During the summer, there is more radiative flux, which produces more buoyancy. Hence more buoyant clouds (cumulus-type) are formed in the summer than in the winter. Instinctively you may recognize that you get more thunderstorms during the summer than ...


2

In Canada there is definitely a rasputitsa period, though it does not occur everywhere or necessarily in the fall, and it is not considered a rasputitsa by name. Every spring in most parts of Canada there is a period of time when many of the soils are saturated with water from the recent snow melt. The various forest services and companies will often close ...


2

In the book - Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics, Volume 30 the author AE Gill defines the perturbation pressure in the paper that OP references as the following. Consider a pressure of a reference system (ocean/atmosphere at rest) and let us call it $$p_0$$. It must be noted that a real atmosphere is never at rest and so we consider deviations from the ...


1

It is strongest in the arctics,most radiation from this area will be long wave infra red and long wave infra red is absorbed and reflected by the climate gases in the atmosphere. A large part of the heat from the sun is reflected by snow and ice,But as the snow and ice melts more heat is absorbed by the water in the ocean the effect of this is larger in the ...


1

Zech–Aslan energy statistic stands out as the most recommended metric Baseline setup and dataset The data that are used represent some aspects of the historical (recent past) and future climates at each grid cell of an array. The reference location corresponds to the grid cell for which analogs are sought, and candidate locations are all grid ...


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