7

The slope is the ratio of the vertical to horizontal distance. From here "Warm fronts have a gentler slope and generally move more slowly than cold fronts, so the rising motion along warm fronts is much more gradual." You can see the steep slope of a cold front visualized, and a more gradual slope for the warm front: But depending on the source, ...


6

You can see this post for a more detailed discussion, but the typical answer to your question is air stagnation. When the atmosphere is stable, there is little mixing, and the air can stagnate. Typically this coincides with low wind speeds and a low boundary layer. The boundary layer holds air near the surface like a blanket. The boundary layer collapses ...


5

This is a topic of almost continual discussion in the South China Morning Post, scmp.com , an English language newspaper in Hong Kong. This is both because air quality is a major problem in China (but one to which they are paying a good deal of attention) and because massive economic interruptions are relatively frequent. The Olympics were a big one, ...


4

I am not sure about your R code or your snippet of data. However, you could do an ncdump on the file and direct the output to text to get it "from the horses mouth" so to speak. In general, the lat/long export of the WRF grid will not have a linear pattern. WRF uses a spatially projected grid, likely an equal area lambert method or something similar. The ...


3

In case you cannot access official local data, I recommend the use of the IFPRI resource MapSPAM2010. Quoting the description of the dataset: Using a variety of inputs, IFPRI's Spatial Production Allocation Model (SPAM) uses a cross-entropy approach to make plausible estimates of crop distribution within disaggregated units. Moving the data from coarser ...


2

You can definitely try to use Earthstat.org and try to recalculate these spatial values with data from FAOSTAT. Other possible data source could be Agroecological zones. Hope that will help!


1

There is a parameter ice water mixing ratio in the gfs.t<hour>z.pgrb2.0p25.f<step> file given at isobaric levels.


1

This probably has less to do with the rain and more to do with the wind. The wind helps move the colder air that is outside into your house more easily because there is more force being exerted on your exterior walls and therefore cooler air can work its way through any small cracks. Sorta similar to the wind chill being colder on windier days. The lessened ...


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