7

Short answer: air, land and water take a while to cool down (or rise in temperature; we see the same thing happening with July and August being the warmest months on average – not June, while June 21st is the longest day). In December, the fall just ended, and everything is relatively warm. Also, depending on how far North you go, the difference between day ...


5

Why are January and February the coldest months although 21 December is the shortest day? For the same reasons that the warmest part of the day generally occurs hours after noon. The daytime temperature only can start decreasing after the outgoing thermal radiation exceeds the incoming solar radiation. Another reason is that water, ground, and even the ...


3

Looking for similar for another recent question, I stumbled across https://www.sparc-climate.org/data-centre/data-access/fisaps/ which lists quite a few options on HVRRD (high vertical resolution radiosonde data) Looks like a lot to sift through, but if your project can work for past data over the US, I found that from ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/ua/rrs-...


2

I hope I can explain this well! I will focus my answer on the ITCZ in the Pacific Ocean. The first point is that the Coriolis force is zero at the equator and maximum at the poles (1). So, another factor comes into play "the walker circulation which is strongly tied to El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). ENSO states are 3: normal conditions, La Niña, ...


2

Any relationship or correlation? That is quite a broad standard. Invoking Tobler's first law of geography, there is a relationship. I would question if there is such a thing universally, but there are some instances that we can see an overlap. For example, many deserts receive plenty of sunlight, but observe little rain. One of the first things that comes to ...


1

I hope this thread is not noticed by our good friends in Australia, who might point out that in their frame of reference January and February are not noted for their coldness! You might be interested to know that there is an astronomical effect which the other answers have overlooked: on about January 6th, the Earth passes through the perihelion point in its ...


1

The answer is easy. Replace $T$ with $T_d$, where $T_d$ is the dewpoint temperature. I will say I am not all that familiar with those equations, but that is besides the point.


1

I have contacted Dr. Larry Oolman, who is in-charge of the weather data provided at http://www.weather.uwyo.edu/upperair/sounding.html, regarding this issue and he has informed me that several countries have started using a new binary format which usually contains higher resolution data. He further added that there is a new site for these new sounding data, ...


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