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Where to start.... If you take a look at midlatitude weather on any given day, you will find a pattern of upper tropospheric winds that look like this (source: NWS): . Notice how it looks like a wave? These are called Rossby waves. You may imagine that the jet stream is imbedded in the ups and downs of these pressure contours. If we take a look at a typical ...


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I took a class once, and we had an approximate equation for an particle (equation sheet is still up): $$\frac{d\vec{v}}{dt}=\frac{\rho_{particle}-\rho_{air}}{\rho_{particle}}\vec{g}-\frac{3\rho_{air}C_D}{4\rho_{particle}CD_{particle}}\vec{v}|\vec{v}|$$ where $\rho$ is density, $\vec{g}$ is the gravity vector (usually $=g\hat{k}$ but can be changed if the ...


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...so how does it get from 1000 to 10,000 feet - what lifts CO2 up? Hmm... how does it get to the mid-troposphere and higher? Well, first, to understand that one may find some helpful information in comments below the question. Second, it always helps to review our own assumptions. In the question, there's an implicit assumption that CO2 does not mix with ...


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It seems your question was more like a thinking exercise rather than a question. I cannot answer your question with robust confidence in the current state of knowledge. The fact is, I have always shared your skepticism on the matter, particularly when being taught this subject matter in graduate classes by the experts who work in the field! What I can offer ...


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It can't be done. That is my guess. I think you would need a pressure suit or cabin. I am a former USAF weather officer with flight experience. I have a Masters Degree in Meteorology and a BS in Space Physics. I have working experience in analyzing the jet stream and also using data for vertical airspeed (or omega, as some call it). That does not give me ...


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