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26 votes
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If a very huge Earthquake occured anywhere on Earth could waves emerge to come together again on the opposite side?

It is called "antipodal focusing". See for example Antipodal focusing of seismic waves observed with the USArray. We present an analysis of the M-w = 5.3 earthquake that occurred in the Southeast ...
Keith McClary's user avatar
23 votes
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Why are there waves in seas towards shore - even in night?

Ocean waves (and also in mediterranean type seas and larger lakes, but on a smaller scale) are generated by two processes: locally generated waves ("wind waves"), which follow the direction of the ...
Ingvar Lukas's user avatar
10 votes
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Are these clouds exhibiting gravity waves?

These are rotor clouds, and are manifestations of "Lee Waves", a particular kind of internal "gravity wave" (better defined as "buoyancy effect"). Forced convection helps form these clouds as warm, ...
Knob Scratcher's user avatar
6 votes
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What might cause these "wave clouds" near the horizon? Could it be gravity waves?

Identification of the phenomenon based solely on the photograph is unfortunately inconclusive, although several reasonable possibilities exist. While a wavelike structure is apparent, exact ...
dplmmr's user avatar
  • 1,144
6 votes
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How can oceanic Rossby waves move from East to West?

Yes it is. In fact Rossby waves always move westward in the absence of a zonal mean flow. Before going into detail lets try to explain this qualitatively. In a barotropic fluid the absolute vorticity ...
Joscha Fregin's user avatar
6 votes

Wave height data for Indian east coast

The paper Assessing Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise between Gopalpur and Puri, Odisha Coast of India, using Remote Sensing and GIS on page 849 states it used wave height data from the INCOIS ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.8k
5 votes

How will climate change affect planetary waves?

As a non-climate specialist, this topic is on the edge of my understanding of meteorology, but here are some papers that I found potentially relevant to your topic. Here is a quote from the summary ...
kingledion's user avatar
  • 3,376
5 votes
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Units of wave spectrum

I understand that the integral of the spectrum over all frequencies is the variance which means that the integral should have $m^2$ units? Please correct me if I am wrong. You are correct. If ...
milancurcic's user avatar
  • 4,993
5 votes
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What's really happening with "stormquakes"?

The article can be found here in Geophysical Research Letters: Fan, W., McGuire, J. J., Groot‐Hedlin, C. D., Hedlin, M. A. H., Coats, S., & Fiedler, J. W. ( 2019). Stormquakes Geophysical Research ...
Exi's user avatar
  • 216
5 votes
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SWAN wave model: HSIG is strangely low

You need to use the following line in your model setup: COORDINATES SPHERICAL Otherwise SWAN will try to calculate wave properties on a curvilinear grid with ...
Ingvar Lukas's user avatar
5 votes
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Are ocean waves diminished, enhanced or unaffected by underwater obstacles

Waves travel over the ocean surface with columns of water molecules moving in a circular motion, as seen here. As you can see, when the waves reach shallow ground, the friction of the molecules over ...
Captain's user avatar
  • 66
5 votes

Are there any types of winds or waves that are produced just by Earth's rotation?

Yes. Such a thing is called an inertial oscillation. Kelvin waves are not examples of inertial oscillations. Kelvin waves balance the earth's rotation against the normal force of a topographic ...
BarocliniCplusplus's user avatar
4 votes

How much water does a wave transport into a sea cave?

The time-averaged material transport by water waves is quantified by Stokes drift, which is the residual Lagrangian drift due to sub-surface orbits not being closed: $$ u_{St} = \dfrac{\omega k^2 a \...
milancurcic's user avatar
  • 4,993
4 votes
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The mean direction of waves in a directional distribution

It is helpful to understand the meaning of Fourier coefficients in the directional wave spectrum analysis. A pitch-and-roll buoy measures time series of water elevation $\eta$, and slopes in both ...
milancurcic's user avatar
  • 4,993
4 votes
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Depth of the wind-induced currents and the shoreline

First, a bit of background, following the Navier-Stokes equations and assuming steady state conditions, we can obtain a simplified balance known as Ekman balance for the boundary layer of the upper ...
arkaia's user avatar
  • 15.5k
4 votes
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ERA Interim problem with Waves

I haven't looked into ERA-Interim wave data a huge amount but I know around 1991 it started to assimilate ocean wave data from satellite altimeters (ERS-1). See the first figure here https://...
Ray Bell's user avatar
  • 201
4 votes

Why does wind blowing against a strong current create way bigger waves?

There are two physical processes at play here: Wind speed relative to the ocean surface Wave focusing and blocking in opposing current Wind speed relative to the ocean surface As you describe in ...
milancurcic's user avatar
  • 4,993
4 votes

Searching for common wave vocabulary

Here is what I found if useful for others - Oceanic Wave Clarification Wave position in space (x,y) and in time (t) are different concepts Ocean waves in time are a vertical oscillation generated ...
J-Dizzle's user avatar
  • 151
4 votes

Do sound waves from volcanic eruptions travel around the world?

Yes, if you include low frequency pressure changes as would be recorded on a barometer as sound waves. The 2022 Hunga Tonga eruption sent atmospheric pressure waves that were detected multiple times ...
GrapefruitIsAwesome's user avatar
4 votes
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How is wind made

Wind is produced by a pressure difference between two places. Air molecules move from higher pressure region to lower pressure region, this movement of air molecules is known as wind.
Harish's user avatar
  • 797
3 votes

How are chenier ridges and strand plains formed at wave dominated coastlines?

The following sources helped me understand these landforms - hopefully they can help you too :) From the Miranda Shorebird Centre: The Miranda-Kaiaua cheniers are first formed as sand and cockle-...
EinsteinFrizz's user avatar
3 votes

How does wind cause large waves?

This is going to be brief as on a phone : I welcome somebody posting a more complete answer. But the basic principle of large waves appearing from wind is: from a smooth water surface, the wind can ...
Semidiurnal Simon's user avatar
3 votes

Travel Times for Seismic Wave Types - Why reflected t-x plot curves

This is conceptually relatively simple if you look at where the reflection (and refraction) happen, and in fact you have articulated the key concept in your question: The reflected wave ...Over ...
Rory Alsop's user avatar
3 votes
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Why is a mild earthquake often mistaken as dizziness or vertigo?

Having experienced many minor earthquakes (Mag 3 to 5 in the East African Rift Valley, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Philippines and Indonesia), and one major life-threatening earthquake (Magnitude 8, Nepal)...
Gordon Stanger's user avatar
3 votes
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Detecting seismic waves using Software Defined Radio

I hope I understand your question right, I think there are some confusion about frequency range and wave-types. Seismic waves are acceleration of matter that transfer kinetic energy from a seismic ...
user2821's user avatar
  • 5,946
3 votes
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Any site for monitoring equatorial oceanic waves?

There are a few sea surface height datasets available on PO.DAAC (the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center), but this one seems to be (near-)real-time and global: the SARAL Near-...
plannapus's user avatar
  • 5,348
3 votes

Why do P waves have a higher velocity in the lower mantle than in the core even though the core has a much higher density?

tldr; Increased density corresponds with decreased P-wave velocity The P-wave velocity for an isotropic medium is: $$ V_p = \sqrt\frac{K+4/3\mu}{\rho} $$ where $K$ is the Bulk Modulus, $\mu$ is the ...
dvoytan's user avatar
  • 121
3 votes

Why are there waves in seas towards shore - even in night?

I'm making my comment an answer. Waves are ubiquitous, except on land ;-). Waves in the open sea are a mix — a superposition — of waves in different directions.1 The dominating direction ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
3 votes

Why are there waves in seas towards shore - even in night?

Wind blows from sea to land in day and land to sea in night due to pressure and temperature difference. Not so much. This is common in the Mediterranean in summer, for example, where the area sits ...
Graham's user avatar
  • 437
3 votes

What are good oceanographic journals

When searching for a place to publish Earth Science stuff, have a look at the two big continental scientific societies: the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the European Geosciences Union (EGU). ...
Jean-Marie Prival's user avatar

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